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The Art of Nature Aquarium

tiger15

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14 Mar 2018
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658
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USA

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Joined
20 May 2020
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118
Location
Kew Gardens
Ryo's video or more specifically the 180P, made me change my plans for my 60cm. It will have to be a 'classic' Nature Aquarium.

ADA layouts don't appear as good as last years, though I think that was an exceptional year and they didn't show all of their layouts.
 

rebel

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Joined
4 Aug 2015
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2,227
The black water apistogramma in that tank is amazing.I like how ADA often use rarer fish that aren’t the usual harlequins etc that we often see in aqua
There are so many suitable fish people can use if they think outside the box a little bit.
You guys are spoilt for fish over there. In Australia we have to pay crazy prizes for uncommon fish. Apistos are often $50 each.
 

Wookii

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13 Nov 2019
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2,171
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Nottingham
Absolutely stunning! Even the Iwagami (and I'm not a huge Iwagami fan) is captivating.

Someone needs to explain this to me though. Huge tanks with just one filter inlet and outlet, barely any flow, and the CO2 diffuser just sending bubbles straight to the surface at the other end of the tank. If I did this I'd have algae everywhere, stunted stem growth - generally a mess. How do they do it?
 

Geoffrey Rea

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27 May 2017
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Cambridgeshire
Well start from a more skeptical position:

- Is that how they run their tanks or is that how they’re presented for filming for a calm aesthetic?

- Always run like that? Not differently at startup, then different again once plant mass is established?

- If you had an efficient and established system, why wouldn’t low turnover and preservation of dissolved gases through low surface agitation be enough to carry the system 24/7?
 

Wookii

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13 Nov 2019
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Nottingham
Well start from a more skeptical position:

- Is that how they run their tanks or is that how they’re presented for filming for a calm aesthetic?

. . . and I thought I was a twisted old sceptic! 😂 . . . Perhaps you're right - I could certainly see them turning a pump down, or off for the video shoot, but do you really think they are pulling some filters outlets and power heads out for filming - aren't these show tanks viewable by the public?

- Always run like that? Not differently at startup, then different again once plant mass is established?

You're far more experienced than me on this - does CO2 distribution become less important to a plant once it becomes established?

- If you had an efficient and established system, why wouldn’t low turnover and preservation of dissolved gases through low surface agitation be enough to carry the system 24/7?

Honestly, I don't know - I wish I did - I hate having to push the water around as much as I do in my own tanks. I've seen similar comments by people that have seen Green Aqua's tanks, in that they are low flow/turnover, but it seems to go against all the advice you see dispensed on this forum, and it must surely result in areas of the aquarium with low(er) CO2?

I do feel like a kid here, not being able to work out how the magic trick is done! 😆
 

tiger15

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14 Mar 2018
Messages
658
Location
USA
In the maintenance video, it said that stems can only be topped a limited number of times before having to be uprooted, chopped, discarded the bottom, and replanted.

I understand the maintenance routine but don’t understand how in nature stem plant beds can be self established.
 

Wolf6

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18 Dec 2014
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557
Location
Netherlands
In the maintenance video, it said that stems can only be topped a limited number of times before having to be uprooted, chopped, discarded the bottom, and replanted.

I understand the maintenance routine but don’t understand how in nature stem plant beds can be self established.
I imagine its like any plant in the garden: it grows untill it falls over/breaks/rots and from the root/remaining bits of stem, new tops form. The tops of the rotted stems float away and land somewhere else, forming new plantbeds occasionally.
 

dw1305

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7 Apr 2008
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nr Bath
Hi all,
it said that stems can only be topped a limited number of times before having to be uprooted, chopped, discarded the bottom, and replanted.
I guess it is to do with the limited number of "axillary buds", these are the (normally dormant) buds in the leaf axils. They contain the meristematic tissue that can grow a new plant. Plants potentially have <"totipotency">, the ability to regenerate a plant from a single cell, but for most plants they can only regrow <"from meristematic tissue">.

apical%20bud.jpg

Every time you remove the shoot tip ("terminal bud") at least one axillary bud is stimulated to grow due to the removal of "apical dominance".
axillary%20buds.jpg


If you keep on cutting the stem at a low level, after a while it won't have any dormant axillary buds left (they all will have grown out and been cut off) and will be unable to produce a new shoot.

cheers Darrel
 
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