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The order of filter media in Oase Biomaster

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22 Feb 2021
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London
Hi all,

Yes I'm only really interested in oxygen, it is <"the prime metric in biological filtration">.

Have a look at Aquarium Science, the planted pages are <"interesting">, but he is very good <"on biological filtration">.
View attachment 179139


Yes it <"certainly can">, that is one advantage of Kaldnes type floating cell media, they are <"designed to shed excess biofilm">. We don't need the <"thick and sticky biofilms"> that might be advantageous in heavily stocked non-planted situations.

cheers Darrel

Also, are we taking Aquarium Science at his word...... I'm highly dubious of that site!
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Wouldn't that put the ceramic media last in the test?
It does, but one thing you have to bear in mind is that the author of Aquarium Science has <"insane stocking rates">.
Those pot scrubbers sound good as ive heard them being used before. Cant get any cheaper either.
A lot of <"Monster Fishkeepers use pot scrubbies">, mainly because of their non-clog nature.
A lot of it seems to be marketing hype.
That is the real issue, <"no scientific data"> and a lot of statements that are <"dubious at best">. I just use <"whatever I have to hand">, it all "works" and once you know that it is oxygen that is the important bit everything else is just <"re-arranging the deck-chairs on the the Titanic">.
why use foam - you'd be way better off filling that basket with a quality filter media.
I'd say foam can be a <"quality filter media">. The <"majority of serious fish-keepers">, who have fish-houses, use an air pump, air ring and foam filtration.
are we taking Aquarium Science at his word...... I'm highly dubious of that site!
Yes I'd agree the planted tank pages are <"interesting">, but the pages on aquarium filtration are (in my opinion) pretty good. I've done some work on the <"bioremediation of landfill leachate"> so I have some scientific understanding of the processes involved.

If you are asking me whether his opinion, or that of <"Stephan Tanner">, <"Timothy Hovanec"> etc are more likely to be right than that of the <"vendor of Biohome?"> I would say they definitely are.

I do have some issues, I've just looked at the <"Biohome media page"> and it says:
"Please note: Tanks with heavy stock and feeding (e.g. cichlid, goldfish, predator or fry tanks) and marine tanks may require 1.5kg - 2kg per 100 litres to achieve the full cycle filtration which will result in the reduction of nitrates. Do not worry about plant growth being affected in a tank which reads zero nitrates - the nitrate is processed into soluble nitrogen which is easily used by plants, boosting their growth."
Which would ring all sorts of alarm bells for me.

cheers Darrel
 
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Joined
22 Feb 2021
Messages
92
Location
London
Hi all,

It does, but one thing you have to bear in mind is that the author of Aquarium Science has <"insane stocking rates">.

A lot of <"Monster Fishkeepers use pot scrubbies"> it is because of their non-clog nature.

That is the real issue, <"no scientific data"> and a lot of statements that are <"dubious at best">. I just use <"whatever I have to hand">, it all "works" and once you know that it is oxygen that is the important bit everything else is just <"re-arranging the deck-chairs on the the Titanic">

I'd say foam can be a <"quality filter media">. The <"majority of serious fish-keepers">, who have fish-houses, use an air pump, air ring and foam filtration.

Yes I'd agree the planted tank pages are <"interesting">, but the pages on aquarium filtration are (in my opinion) pretty good. I've done some work on the <"bioremediation of landfill leachate"> so I have some scientific understanding of the processes involved.

If you are asking me whether his opinion, or that of <"Stephan Tanner">, <"Timothy Hovanec"> etc are more likely to be right than that of the <"vendor of Biohome?"> I would say they definitely are.





cheers Darrel

Interesting, what is the long and short of the research then - basically that we should just fill our entire filter with foam?
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
basically that we should just fill our entire filter with foam?
I honestly don't think it matters that much what you use. If some-one else is buying I'll have <"Eheim Coco-pops">, mainly because they aren't made of plastic and will last eternally. If I'm buying my own? Generic Kaldnes type floating cell media, <"Alfagrog or Hydroleca">.

You don't need to fill the filter body with foam, but you need to make sure you don't have any bypass. My main use of foam <"is as a pre-filter">, usually <"as a DIY version">. In recent times I've mainly used the <"Koi type drilled sponges">, they are cheap and they work effectively.

cheers Darrel
 

Jaseon

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10 Jan 2021
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378
Location
Wales
Interesting, what is the long and short of the research then - basically that we should just fill our entire filter with foam?
Yeah well its an interesting question. Why are HMF successful when they don't seem to function as typical biological media do ie your k1, and ceramics etc.
 

Jaseon

Member
Joined
10 Jan 2021
Messages
378
Location
Wales
Hi all,

In recent times I've mainly used the <"Koi type drilled sponges">, they are cheap and they work effectively.

cheers Darrel
I bought a few of those pool filter sponges, and inserted a cheap filter. I cut them in half then block off the other end with some fine pad. I have one running in a small shrimp tank, and it works great.

20211231_180356.jpg
20211231_180435.jpg
 

dw1305

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UKAPS Team
Joined
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Messages
13,975
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Hi all,
Yeah well its an interesting question. Why are HMF successful when they don't seem to function as typical biological media do ie your k1, and ceramics etc.
It is different for HMF (and trickle filters etc.). In a canister type filter <"a finite amount of oxygen"> enters the filter and it can only be replenished as new water flows in.

The problem is that if the <"BOD exceeds the oxygen supply"> aerobic nitrification will be compromised and levels of ammonia and/or nitrite will rise.

In an HMF it is in contact with the atmosphere at its top and the oxygenated tank water bathes it.

There is a description of how an HMF works in <"on Aquarium biofiltration">, in our terms it is <"fulfilling the role of both filter and substrate">.

The latest incarnation of the <"Kaldnes media"> includes some <"carrier biochips"> that are designed to support and protect Rotifers, Protists etc.

Cheers Darrel
 
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