Tips for pruning Rotala SP Green

Discussion in 'Plant Help' started by Nano Jake, 30 Mar 2009.

  1. Nano Jake

    Nano Jake Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Southgate
    I need some advice getting my Rotala to grow more bush like, at the moment it looks a bit unsightly just long stems reaching to the top of the tank [60p]. Should I cut it low to promote outward growth??? whats the secret :D
     
  2. Stu Worrall

    Stu Worrall Forum Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,986
    Location:
    Flintshire, North Wales
    cut it low and then just below where its been cut it will sprout into two stems. let them grow and then cut back again just above this and eventually it will bush up. (called ramification in bonsai) just remember to cut low enough as youll be cutting back again in the future, just depends on what final height you want.
     
  3. Nano Jake

    Nano Jake Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Southgate
    Perfect thanks, will give it a go.
     
  4. Mark Evans

    Mark Evans Expert

    Messages:
    6,492
    Location:
    newark notts.
    most important you leave it to grow to the surface after every cut, or else you'll see it off or it will stunt. 8)
     
  5. Nano Jake

    Nano Jake Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Southgate
    Really? didnt realise thanks.
     
  6. Mark Evans

    Mark Evans Expert

    Messages:
    6,492
    Location:
    newark notts.
    for sure mate. so from planting, leave it to grow to the yop. it gives the stem itself good structure. also allows the plant to become strong, then cut, lets say 3 inches from the substrate. leave it to grow to the top again, then cut an inch above the first cut so on and so forth.....if you trim a new stem thats only 2 inches long, it wont really produce anything of quality.

    6days-1.jpg

    _MG_9711-01.jpg

    and i'm not finished with them yet. thats after 1 trim.i'm by no means an expert but learning all the time, like everyone else. this is just me experience with stems in general. they all work the same. :D

    stems slow up a bit when they've been trimmed so be patient and it will reward you with a good bush
     
  7. gratts

    gratts Member

    Messages:
    267
    Thanks for that Mark, really useful. I was just cutting mine willy nilly! :D
     
  8. Paulo Soares

    Paulo Soares Member

    Messages:
    612
    This is a post from 2009 but still i think i should say this to others who may came across this post.
    I tried for 4 times in different tanks and layouts this plant.

    Fisrt this plant needs a lot of CO2 and high light to get the best result. And I don´t think you should let the plant go to the top after a prune. I suggest to prune regularly. By this way you will create a very very bushy plant cause each time you prune the plant it will produce 2 or 3 new runners/shoots.
    Also the cuttings can be replanted directly into substrate.

    With a good Co2 and High Light the plant will get very colours. With a weaker light the plant will stay green and with a bit of luck a yellow, as she get most near to the top where the light intensity is bigger.

    Now there is a problem that was not focus in this conversation. If you let the plant grow to the top as mention before, the lower sections will be in shadow cause of the bush produced in the upper sections. So it is not a really good ideia to let it grow to the top. (My opinion buy my experience). The lower sections will get weaker and start to melt cause of low light. This happen twice to me.
    So the last time i prune it regularly (once every two weeks more or less) and the plant kept in a good shape bringing good colours and stay at the height i desire, and therefore as the lower sections of the plant receive a lot of light stay strong and never felt any weekness.

    This is my opinion and by no means i intend to counter any one.

    Best compliments.
     
  9. Mick.Dk

    Mick.Dk Member

    Messages:
    1,403
    Location:
    Dk
    Didn't see this thread before..............but I need to make it clear, that pic.s and description of colouring up is defenitely referring to another species, namely Rotala rotundifolia!!
    Rotala sp. 'green' will not colour up, even in brightest light, but remain a bright green - hence the name.......
    Growth-patern of Rotala sp. 'green' is actually not the same as of Rotala rotundifolia either. Rotala sp. 'green' has a much more "overhanging" or "fountain"like growth, whereas Rotala rotundifolia has far more "straight" and "up-going" growth.
    - for trimming of both kinds, I'd actually recommend the "Black Current Method" - which means cutting back (quite low) a third of any given group of stems - wait a period of time (different for different set-ups) and cut another third of stems - wait again, and finally cut the last third of stems..........and then wait, and start all over again.
    The idea is, to allways cut away longest (oldest) stems in a continuous cycle
     
  10. Mick.Dk

    Mick.Dk Member

    Messages:
    1,403
    Location:
    Dk
    thereby keeping the group of stems young and in growth, at all times - and at the same time keep the group of stems presentable at all times (as in not cutting it all in one go!!)
    This smaller trimmings are actually better for the general "health" of the tank, too ........
     
  11. Paulo Soares

    Paulo Soares Member

    Messages:
    612
    Got you. ;)
    Just like we do in agriculture to fertilize a field. And yes i was refering to "Rotundifolia". I missed the title. Sorry about that.
    Best regards
     
  12. Mick.Dk

    Mick.Dk Member

    Messages:
    1,403
    Location:
    Dk
    He he - I learned it at nursery-school years ago........but it works for aquatics, too ;)
     
  13. Paulo Soares

    Paulo Soares Member

    Messages:
    612
    Yet let me tell you that this method of triming i actually do for all plants. For instance in "Rotala Macrandra" i do that. And so i always have a pretty good bush of it with lightning reds!! :)
     
    Mick.Dk likes this.

Share This Page

Facebook Page
Twitter Page
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice