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Transfer moss with BGA to a clean tank ?

eminor

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Hello, my nephew gave me some moss, there is some blue green algae on it, i was thinking to put it in 1 liters of water with glutaraldehyde but i don't know which dosage and duration is safe ? any idea ? thx
 

Tim Harrison

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It depends on the conditions in your tank. If it’s established without many algae issues it could just as well clear up by itself.

However, JP has point, there is always a risk it could spread. Try a search in Google using UKAPS, moss, blue green algae and Cyanobacteria, see what comes up.

Do some research of your own, as well as taking advice from here. And then make an informed decision.
 

eminor

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It depends on the conditions in your tank. If it’s established without many algae issues it could just as well clear up by itself.

However, JP has point, there is always a risk it could spread. Try a search in Google using UKAPS, moss, blue green algae and Cyanobacteria, see what comes up.

Do some research of your own, as well as taking advice from here. And then make an informed decision.
thx guys, i already introduced bga from plant nursery without issue, my co2 is perfect, i might avoid doing that though, i have other moss in that tank and i won't risk to bother them. That algae is stubborn, bba would have been much easier to manage =)
 

jaypeecee

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Do some research of your own, as well as taking advice from here. And then make an informed decision.
Hi Everyone,

In my opinion, doing one's own research is probably the best way to learn. And it's exciting. Making a new discovery is highly rewarding and boosts confidence. I wholeheartedly recommend it. Citizen Science at its best!

JPC :geek: :thumbup:
 

Hanuman

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I would say no problem. BGA is in most tanks (if not all) even if it's not visible. Does't mean you should go and add whatever in your tank if you don't feel like it. My approach though is different. I do not bother disinfecting plants I buy or receive. I simply rinse them thoroughly to remove any excess of whatever is on it. A stable and healthy tank normally takes care of the rest. I have plants in my tanks that I have received from all parts of the world and I have no issues.

Now the issue with mosses is that they are usually sensitive to most treatment you use (bleach, hydrogen peroxide or glut). Only real treatment you could do in my opinion is an antibiotic treatment in a separate container. That would kills of the bacteria since BGA is a bacteria, not an algae.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Hello, my nephew gave me some moss, there is some blue green algae on it, i was thinking to put it in 1 liters of water with glutaraldehyde but i don't know which dosage and duration is safe ? any idea ? thx
What ,@Hanuman says. Just wash it under the cold tap in a sieve etc. You can use quite a lot of water pressure.

Cheers Darrel
 

jaypeecee

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BGA is in most tanks (if not all) even if it's not visible.
Hi @Hanuman

May I ask - what evidence do you have in support of the above? In particular, if it's not visible, what are you using to detect its presence?

Does't mean you should go and add whatever in your tank if you don't feel like it.

In my experience, it's generally best not to add any magic potions. Getting the balance of nutrients, pH and water hardness (GH) correct should keep things in check. But, it may not be a case of 'one size fits all'. It's easy to overlook the fact that there are many species of Cyanobacteria - even within the same Genus.

JPC
 

Libba

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If you feel the need to treat it, then like Hanuman pointed out, an antibiotic treatment makes a lot more sense than gluteraldehyde.
 

jaypeecee

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If you feel the need to treat it, then like Hanuman pointed out, an antibiotic treatment makes a lot more sense than gluteraldehyde.

Hi @Libba and @eminor

It would be very wise to check the legality and use of fish antibiotics and other treatments throughout Europe.

I thought it was worth mentioning this - even though I am not in favour of this approach.

JPC
 

Hanuman

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May I ask - what evidence do you have in support of the above? In particular, if it's not visible, what are you using to detect its presence?
If you are asking me if I tested 100's of tank to support what I said, I haven't and to be honest I think it's just not necessary. There is a more direct way to assess this, which is that cyanobacteria is virtually in every water body on this planet, that it's been with us for a good 2.7 billion years and still thriving and also that it can be airborne and can survive the harshest environments.

Even without prior testing a tank I would be willing to bet 100:1 there is cyanobacteria in there. As for what species is present, I have no clue, one would definitely need to test for that. This said, there are many direct pathways for cyanobacteria to get into a tank, all of which happen either very regularly or at some point in time:
1. water
2. animals (fish, shrimp etc)
3. Soil
4. hardscape
5. plants
6. your hands and other tools you introduce in the tank
7. air

IMO, the probability for having a tank without cyanobacteria is extremely slim. Our tanks are not water treatment plants with chlorine and other highly sophisticated means to eradicate whatever life-form there is in the water. Even water treatment plants can't achieve that 100% due to environment factors.

In my experience, it's generally best not to add any magic potions. Getting the balance of nutrients, pH and water hardness (GH) correct should keep things in check. But, it may not be a case of 'one size fits all'. It's easy to overlook the fact that there are many species of Cyanobacteria - even within the same Genus.
Yes over 2000 species. Many times over it is beyond your control what you are adding in your tank because of the reasons I stated above (contaminated soil, fish, plants etc). There is no way you can guarantee what you have in your tanks at any given moment.

But obviously all the above is just my opinion based on an educated guess so I have no issue people questioning me since there is no absolute truth.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
May I ask - what evidence do you have in support of the above? In particular, if it's not visible, what are you using to detect its presence?
You can smell it, if your tank has a <"slightly earthy">, pondy smell, <"however faint">, that is from the Cyanobacteria.
Even without prior testing a tank I would be willing to bet 100:1 there is cyanobacteria in there. As for what species is present, I have no clue, one would definitely need to test for that. This said, there are many direct pathways for cyanobacteria to get into a tank, all of which happen either very regularly or at some point in time: ............ IMO, the probability for having a tank without cyanobacteria is extremely slim.
Yes, agree with @Hanuman , all liquid water, that isn't from a DI unit, or very heavily chlorinated, has Cyanobacteria present.
There is a more direct way to assess this, which is that cyanobacteria is virtually in every water body on this planet, that it's been with us for a good 2.7 billion years and still thriving and also that it can be airborne and can survive the harshest environments.
Yes, they are like <"Diatoms">, or the <"Green Algae">, universal where ever there is liquid water and light.
It would be very wise to check the legality and use of fish antibiotics and other treatments throughout Europe.
Yes, not legal in the UK, for <"very good reasons">.

cheers Darrel
 

Hanuman

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You can smell it, if your tank has a <"slightly earthy">, pondy smell, <"however faint">, that is from the Cyanobacteria.
Yes and an unpleasant smell if I say so myself. When my tank has episode of BGA I can smell it only by smelling the water surface and it's not like my tank is covered by BGA, there are only small patches between the glass and the substrate.
 

FrankR

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Hi all,

You can smell it, if your tank has a <"slightly earthy">, pondy smell, <"however faint">, that is from the Cyanobacteria.

Yes, agree with @Hanuman , all liquid water, that isn't from a DI unit, or very heavily chlorinated, has Cyanobacteria present.

Yes, they are like <"Diatoms">, or the <"Green Algae">, universal where ever there is liquid water and light.

Yes, not legal in the UK, for <"very good reasons">.

cheers Darrel
Oh yes! That musty smell! I'm also battling cyano atm and I could smell it several days before it appeared.

The fact that we can't see cyano, doesn't mean that it's not there. Most probably other bacteria/organisms keeps it in check. So there's a balance.
From my limited experience cyano blooms occur when the conditions are right and there are no competitive organisms.
I wouldn't add any plant with cyano into a tank, unless the tank's mature. Also, I'm against using antibiotics to treat cyano. You're killing the beneficial bacteria as well.
 

jaypeecee

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Hi @Hanuman

Thanks for your replies.

But obviously all the above is just my opinion based on an educated guess so I have no issue people questioning me since there is no absolute truth.

OK, fair enough.

IMO, the probability for having a tank without cyanobacteria is extremely slim. Our tanks are not water treatment plants with chlorine and other highly sophisticated means to eradicate whatever life-form there is in the water.

A tank in which a UV-C sterilizer is used could potentially have no living cyanobacteria. And, tanks in which there is negligible* iron would not be able to support cyanobacteria growth.

* I can provide figures, if necessary.

Oscillatoria seems to be a common Genus in our tanks. And, when alive, the 'strands' of Oscillatoria oscillate from side to side, hence its name. It's easy to see under a microscope. This is where my Cyanobacteria (aka BGA) journey began:


JPC
 

jaypeecee

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You can smell it, if your tank has a <"slightly earthy">, pondy smell, <"however faint">, that is from the Cyanobacteria.
Hi @dw1305

I have a hunch that the smell you are detecting may be from dead/decomposing cyanobacteria. If I'm right, then removal of it should go a long way to controlling it. Only very rarely have I been aware of the smell that you are describing. I wouldn't rely on any smell from freshly-growing Cyanobacteria.

JPC
 
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Hanuman

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A tank in which a UV-C sterilizer is used could potentially have no living cyanobacteria.
Possible but I would bet again here that the very large majority of planted tanks don't have UV lamps and don't actually need one.
And, tanks in which there is negligible* iron would not be able to support cyanobacteria growth.
Perhaps, but any tank with active aquasoil/clay based substrate will have more than enough iron for BGA to thrive.
I have a hunch that the smell you are detecting may be from dead/decomposing cyanobacteria. If I'm right, then removal of it should go some way to controlling it. Only very rarely have I been aware of the smell that you are describing.
It's pretty much alive cyanobacteria. When you touch it green, even after washing your hand you'll have the smell stick. It's pretty strong. Once I treat it with hydrogen peroxide the smell is gone in a day.
 

jaypeecee

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jaypeecee

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It's pretty much alive cyanobacteria.
Hi @Hanuman

OK, it would appear that you have Cyano pretty much under control. And, it's interesting that fewer people here on UKAPS seem to currently be having problems with Cyano. It's something I keep an eye on - just out of personal curiosity.

Thanks for the discussion.

JPC
 
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