Trimming new emersed/submersed plants - new setup

DaanV

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Hi everyone,

I got a question about trimming Rotala rotundifolia green and Colorata.
I planted these plants about a week ago in a emersed state.
So far all plants are doing great! New leaves look super healthy, and are transitioning to their submersed state.
Plants were about 10cm heigh and have grown almost 5cm now. Still some time till they reach the surface :)

My question is about their first trimming. In the past, I used to pull out the plants when they grew up to the surface and just replanted the emersed part. But i'm not sure if thats the right thing to do?

Should i just trim them and keep the submersed stems in the tank or something else? How do you guys do this?

Thanks for the advice!

Daan
 
Last edited:

Tim Harrison

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Hello Dean and welcome to UKAPS. I just trim to the height required and replant the tops. I don't remove the original plant.
 

DaanV

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6 Sep 2019
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Hi Tim,

Thanks for you answer!
But what about the emersed leaves that stay on the stems?
Won't they just wither away? Isn't it better to keep the new tops of the stem plants (with the new submersed leaves) and pull out the remaining emersed parts?

Btw i'm reading through ADA 2011 - 09, and their just suggesting the same as you. The initial trim should be done at the lower part of the stem plants.
 

Tim Harrison

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You can always trim them back to substrate level, rather than pulling them out, if it bothers you.
But if you leave them in with a good section of stem they will most likely sprout new shoots again, increasing the density of the stand.
 

DaanV

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Alright! Sounds good to me :D
Jurijs Jutjajevs was saying the same in one his youtube videos. Just cut them back to substrate level :thumbup:
 

Tim Harrison

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Stems will always be messy toward the base. Most scapers hide that bit behind hardscape or lower growing plants and trim to just below that level. The point where the new growth originates is then also hidden and that helps to keep the scape looking neat and tidy, see below...

48161889791_c36691ab93_b.jpg
 

DaanV

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6 Sep 2019
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Location
Belgium

Thanks for the advice Tim! Btw great scape! Following you on insta ;)
Picture above is taken yesterday. Tank is running for 1 week - fingers crossed :D
 

Tim Harrison

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That's looking great Dean, keep up the good work, and thanks :)
 

DaanV

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6 Sep 2019
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Location
Belgium
I'll think about it :D
Btw be free to follow my scapes at instagram: team_aquascaping.be ;)
 

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