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What is this tanganyika plant?

sinan m.d

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31 Jan 2017
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Turkey
Hello everyone. I will setup a biotop aquarium and I want to add specific lake plants. I searched for flora and couldn't find it. I have some picture, photographer says vallisneria, but I think it doesn't seem vallisneria. So what is this plants?
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And,
 
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zozo

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16 Apr 2015
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From an Article published on www.tanganyika.nl
A list of plants growing in this lake are

* Valisneria spiralis var. denserrulata
* Ceratophyllum demersum
* Myriophyllum spicatum
* Potamogeton schweinfurthii
* Potamogeton pectinatus
* Pista stratiotes
* Hydrilla verticillata
* Najas horrida

:)
Regarding this article author the source is Christel Kasselman Aquariumplants Handbook.
No ISBN given
https://www.google.com/search?sourc...82.1......0....1j2..gws-wiz.....0.TFpM3u1OG6M

Seeing your pictures my best guess its a potamogeton , not fully developed.
 
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dw1305

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Hi all,
There are a large number of different plants in Lake Tanganyika, a lot of the endemic, and very few of them commercially available. The "there aren't many/any plants in Lake Tanganyika" has come about because most of the commercially available cichlids come from rocky, or sandy, habitats where you could capture them fairly easily, and there aren't many plants.

It is such a huge lake it is more like a sea with cliffs and beaches, but away from these there are quieter areas where sediment accumulates and plant grow.

The long leaved plant definitely looks like a Vallisneria sp. and so is presumably V. spiralis aethiopica. The rosette plant, with a broader leaf looks like it is also from the family Hydrocharitaceae, according to <"A checklist of Zambian vascular plants"> there are four Ottelia species, Ottelia cylindrica, O. exserta, O. ulvifolia & O. verdickii, but I can't find pictures of the submerged foliage of any of these.

Another families that look a possibility is the Alismataceae, that has Ranalisma humile listed, along with BURNATIA enneandra, CALDESIA reniformis, LIMNOPHYTON angolense, L. obtusifolium & WIESNERIA filifolia, but I'm not familiar with any of these genera.

cheers Darrel
 

Oldguy

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Gloucestershire, UK
I will setup a biotop aquarium
If you can not get plants from Lake Tanganyika, then looking at zozo's list above
A list of plants growing in this lake are
The milfoil and the hornwort are both present in the UK, both as native plants and commercially available as pond plants. The hornwort will grow floating vertically and is considered goldfish proof, may stand up to your cichlids. A UK native Potamogeton that likes hard water (seen it coated in white 'lime' deposits) is P. crispus, a common UK native that will grow in low tech aquariums. The milfoil M. spicatum also likes hard water and again have seen it coated in 'lime'. Hope this is of some help.
 

zozo

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(seen it coated in white 'lime' deposits)

That is discussed before in a thread here. I forgot and didn't bookmark it. But it has to to with Calcium carbonate cycle and the plants ability especialy at PH8 + to take the CO² from the carbonates resulting in a calcium deposite on the leaves. In ponds the potamogeton is used as PH indicator, if you see the leaves depositing calcium it's time to check PH and lower it. :)

Anubias also does this above PH 8 and also certain green algae.
 

Oldguy

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Calcium carbonate cycle
biogene ontkalking
Canadian pond weed also does this. Was introduced to lower calcium salts from out flows from paper mills, don't know if it was effective. However have seen it in shallow ponds and ditches in chalk rich land coated in calcium carbonate and in full flower. Would I be correct in translating biogene ontkalking as biogenic decalcification
 
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zozo

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I have rather high alkelinity water PH 7.8 to 8.3 - KH10 - GH6, i see this decalcification on large leaved pondweed if i grow it in the garden tubs in the sun. And in the indoor tank i've seen it on Anubias and seen black rocks covered with green algae kinda turn completely yellowish white.

It only seems to occur at PH above 8, but that is not the root cause.. I've also seen it go away again spontaniously without changing water parameters.
I'm also not realy monitoring the PH values constantly, but i guess it can't change much with my regular WC.. It might be the tank/plants/substrate still needed to mature and build up it's own remedi against it. What ever it is..

Regarding the Anubias i might be wrong and it actualy also was green spot algae growth on the leaves first that accumulated the calcium deposite. Dunno that..
 
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zozo

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Potamageton perfoliatus

Yes excactly that plant does it readily in higher light condition.. :) Than the leaves feel like sandpaper. Grew this plant together with the narrow leaved Potamogeton gayi, it's South American cousin which is not affected, or maybe needs other condition for it.
 
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