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Where to keep fishes after creating a new aquascape?

SusanneK

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Joined
28 Jan 2022
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29
Location
Sweden
Hi!

I have an aquarium with som platys and tetras today and are going to create my first aquascape. Now I wonder how to best take care of my fishes after the scape is done...
Is it better for the fishes to live in a big plastic box for a week or two (with the old water and all gear?) or do I let them in the newly planted aquarium and do many water changes?

I also wonder about how to do with my heater...
I have a heater in my aquarium, but the rooms in the house are always warm, between 22-25 degrees. Should I take it out or is it better to let it in?

Susanne
 

Hufsa

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22 Aug 2019
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1,730
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Norway
Will your new aquascape include any plant soil? Like Tropica soil, or Ada Amazonia?
If possible it can be a good idea to soak this soil in buckets for a few weeks to let it release the majority of the ammonia. You would then change the water in the buckets a few times, and test the water to see when the reading for ammonia reaches 0 😊
This way the rescape of the tank will be much safer, as you can add your fish back in without exposing them to ammonia levels.

Please let me know if this is not what you are planning, and I will get back to you :thumbup:
 

hwscot

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15 Nov 2021
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82
Location
Montrose
I guess a lot would depend on the plastic boxes, but I'd be wary of using plastic boxes that were not food safe, as the phthalates could be an issue if the fish are in there for more than a short time. I know they can be tempting because they can give you a big volume of water for a low cost.
Unless budget is super tight, I'd consider getting a basic tank that's made for fish, and setting it up with as much as you can from your current tank .. substrate, filter media, water and plants .. and using that as a temporary stock tank. It doesn't need to be pretty. Then you're under less pressure to rush the new aquascape and you can let the newly scaped tank mature well enough for the fish to be safe. We all struggle to control the impatience when we're setting up a new tank, even though we know patience is the key to success. The heater, if you can only afford one, would be better with the fish. I would think with your room temperatures, most plants would manage in an unheated tank.
The stock tank is bound to come in useful in the future as a breeding or growing on tank, either for young platies, or maybe even to try spawning the tetras.
 

Hanuman

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4 Jan 2019
Messages
1,734
Location
Thailand
I'll show you how we do it in this part of the world. Styrofoam.
IMG_6507.jpg

If in your present tank you have some soil, use part of that as a base layer before adding your new soil. It will speed up the cycle. If not then the cycle might take 2/3 weeks depending what soil you use. Some soil release minimal ammonia so more frequent water changes will work. If you are using Amazonia then I would suggest keeping fish aside in another tank or platic box as you suggested as long as they have enough space and you keep running your filter in that box.

You may also seed the new tank with bacteria from your present filter sponges. It will speed up the process as well.
 

jamiepearson

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Joined
20 Feb 2021
Messages
81
Location
Edinburgh
I recently moved to a larger tank and rescaped. I had four bags of Tropica soil in buckets of water for a month prior. And then did the normal daily 80% water changes on the new tank and parameter testing. I did some hardscape planning so the livestock were only in a holding plastic tub of a day and night. Put the heater in a mug or on a plate so it doesn't melt the plastic
 

pat1cp

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6 Oct 2021
Messages
243
Location
Ballater, Aberdeenshire
I recently moved to a larger tank and rescaped. I had four bags of Tropica soil in buckets of water for a month prior. And then did the normal daily 80% water changes on the new tank and parameter testing. I did some hardscape planning so the livestock were only in a holding plastic tub of a day and night. Put the heater in a mug or on a plate so it doesn't melt the plastic
Though all of this is spot on, could be a bit confusing for somone inheriting their first tank and re-scaping their first aquascape.

Tropica soil, like alot of substrates will put material (ammonia) into the water for a while, which isn't good for fish. That's why people soak it (to remove the harmful material). You could do some water changes in the bucket too.

You could get one of these Amazon product to test the water to check.

If you are planning on using the existing substrate, could be okay. Not sure what your plan is.
 

SusanneK

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Thread starter
Joined
28 Jan 2022
Messages
29
Location
Sweden
Wow, I'm so happy to get of all your responses! Thank you so very much! :)

I have bought 9 liter of Tropica Aquarium soil to have in my aquarium. Right now there is only gravel in it.
Then I'll put it in buckets and add water to it and let it stay in there for some weeks as you say, doing water changes to remove the ammonia.
I had never though about that, so thanks!

Hopefully I'll buy another tank in the future and then I can move everything to this new tank as you suggest when doing another scape.

As for photos, my aquarium looks too ugly right now with an airplane and plastic root in it so I'll show you a photo when my first scape is done instead...:) But I do have some plants with stems in it too (that I'll throw away when I do my new tank I think...).

Thanks again!
Susanne
 
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