• You are viewing the forum as a Guest, please login (you can use your Facebook, Twitter, Google or Microsoft account to login) or register using this link: Log in or Sign Up
  • You can now follow UKAPS on Instagram.

Which Crossocheilus siamensis???

sanj

Member
Joined
10 Apr 2008
Messages
1,529
Location
Coventry, UK
Way back in 1994 a couple of guys wrote an article in The Krib on algae eating cyprinids and how to distinguish Crossocheilus siamensis, the Siamese Algae Eater from the likes of the Siamese Flying Fox and the Chinese Algae Eater. Pretty obvious you might think, but back then the SAE was not as well known as it is today. Algae Eating Cyprinids

However until perhaps the last few years it was not common knowledge in the hobby that Crossocheilus siamensis was not actually a species and referred to a few closely related species of which at least two are pretty common in the UK trade.

What is the big deal? Well they might look very similar, but they exhibit different behaviours. One species having the more desirable traits and the other less so.

Mr. Desirable; Crossocheilus langei, the Red SAE.
It grows to a good 6" and munches on BBA which few other fish if any will touch.
Clangei4.jpg

Clangei3.jpg

Clangei2.jpg

Clangei1.jpg


Mr. Somewhat Naughty; Crossocheilus atrilimes.
this fella is smaller, grows to 4" probably its only advantage over the Red SAE, appears to have a shorter snout and a better distinguished light golden line above the black one spanning the length of the fish.
Not so great is that while it generally munches on algae, its not so great with BBA. Possibly even worse is that it tends to have a penchant for moss.

Catrilimes3.jpg

Catrilimes2.jpg

Catrilimes1.jpg


On a side note there is another algae eater of the same genus that is often touted as being even better at general algae munching, although I think that might just be down to it growing to a larger size (7-8"). This fella is C.reticulatus, the Reticulated Algae Eater:
Creticulatus.jpg



There is more information available on the net from other people. Since I have both of the commonly found "C.siamensis", i thought taking a few photos might aid others who have particular needs from their SAE's and dont want to end up with Mr. Naughty.

Personally I quite like Mr Naughty, I just do not have much moss anymore.

Other links:
Calling All Siamese Algae Eater Owners!!
http://www.seriouslyfish.com/profile.ph ... ei&id=1324
 

quayhouse

Seedling
Joined
12 Nov 2013
Messages
4
Location
Fareham, Hampshire
I have six reticulated algae eaters, they are superb algae eaters constantly grazing, never damage the plants and don't bother my other fish.

They seem to prefer caves and they are a little on the big side, mine are all about 5inches and pretty chunky. They are jumpers.
 

NatureBoy

Member
Joined
27 Aug 2008
Messages
374
They are epic to watch when they get stuck into a bit of BBA, they really have a good tug at it, the little beauties! I find myself watching them all the time...what they gonna do next? compulsive viewing for someone as easily pleased as me
 

limz_777

Member
Joined
29 Mar 2014
Messages
162
i have read this thread before , but its quite a challenge to id it when its a juvenile
 

NatureBoy

Member
Joined
27 Aug 2008
Messages
374
Mr desirable has a black smudge on his underbelly
 

mikka23

Member
Joined
12 May 2010
Messages
51
Location
Edinburgh
Glad I saw this thread. Now I'm in a bit of quandary. I have wanted an SAE for a while but I also want to give moss a go. I'll check my local but I assume they are Mr Naughty as you put it.

Any other tips to ID between the two? The photos look more or less the same to me.
 

limz_777

Member
Joined
29 Mar 2014
Messages
162
Mr desirable has a black smudge on his underbelly

ah yes , regarding the black smudge , does it have it during the juvenile stage ?

some pics will be good

@mikka the snout is quite a clear indication during adult , for juvies its quite difficult to see
 

NatureBoy

Member
Joined
27 Aug 2008
Messages
374
yep as far as I've seen.
ah yes , regarding the black smudge , does it have it during the juvenile stage ?

some pics will be good

@mikka the snout is quite a clear indication during adult , for juvies its quite difficult to see
yep, just a little black streak that could be mistaken for a digestive tract kind of thing
 
Top