Why are my new Sagittaria Subulata turning brown/yellow?

Discussion in 'Plant Help' started by jamesw, 7 Aug 2009.

  1. jamesw

    jamesw Member

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    Ive recently added some plants into my tank. The plants i have are, java moss, java fern, amazon sword, Vallisneria Spiralis, Sagittaria pusilus. These are all doing fine in my tank so far but my Sagittaria Subulata has turned brown and yellow, does anyone no what this could be? My aquarium is a rio 400 (400 litres) with t5 lighting - two 54 watt bulbs with one reflector, this is on for 10 hours a day. I am dosing daily flora 24 and flourish excel. Thanks
     
  2. jamesw

    jamesw Member

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    anyone?
     
  3. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Expert/Global Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, assuming that it isn't due to transitioning leaves from emmersed to submersed, there are two possibilities; either they are responding poorly to liquid carbon or there is not enough of it.

    Cheers,
     
  4. GreenNeedle

    GreenNeedle Member

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    Flora 24 is traces. Excel is carbon. By adding the carbon you are increasing the plants needs of nutrients. You aren't adding any NPK. Fish won't supply enough in a carbon enriched tank. Therefore by adding the carbon you are increasing the need to add NPK into the system!!!

    Thats a lot of light to not dose NPK too.

    AC
     
  5. jamesw

    jamesw Member

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    what is NPK? where can i buy it from?
     
  6. jamesw

    jamesw Member

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    i do have messy fish though. And i also do weekly 25% water changes so doesnt this put that into the water?
     
  7. GreenNeedle

    GreenNeedle Member

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    If you run a tank without CO2, and low light then you may get away with the fish waste supplying enough.

    I would suggest your light is borderline for CO2. Not low at all!!!! Therefore it would definately already need a little boost on top of the fish/food waste. Add to that you are adding a carbon supplement andyou suddenly have plants growing at super speed compared to a non CO2 tank!!!

    Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium (NPK). We get them from Potassium Nitrate (K and N) and Mono Potassium Phosphate (MPK.) Then some ad it as dry powder whilst others (like me) mix it into solutions and dose it that way.

    These can be bought from Aquaessentials, fluidesensor etc. both sponsors on here.

    AC
     
  8. jamesw

    jamesw Member

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    And why is it only these plants that suffer the deficiency, not the others?
     
  9. GreenNeedle

    GreenNeedle Member

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    Plants like creatures have differing needs and differing vulnerabilities. Some want higher amounts than others of a particular nutrient. Some fight/utilise nutrients better/easier than others. Some can get by on the bare minimum etc. It may be that this plant struggles to beat the others to the goodies it requires and there isn't enough of something left once the others have got what they want. Not a plant I have used before.

    Typically the so called 'low light' plants are quite adept at getting what they want hence they thrive in conditions that others can't.

    AC
     

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