180l cycling

Discussion in 'Water Chemistry' started by mlgt, 8 Jul 2009.

  1. mlgt

    mlgt Member

    Messages:
    1,015
    Location:
    London
    Im hoping to pick up a 180l tank this week rather than the 125... (arghh am I mad?)

    Anyways, I have a 80l tank right now (big jump)and of course I will have to cycle the newer tank. Since its an existing tank and has a fully mature filter (1 years old)

    I was hoping to transfer around 60% of current water from my tank and then adding RO water from my friends place to cycle the water and get it to to correct temp.

    How long should I be cycling this for? Would it be beneficial to bring as much water in the 180 tank water?

    My current fishes will benefit from a 40% water change tonight, but I was wondering. If I fill up the new tank with my "water change" each day will this suffice?

    I wont be siphoning any of the muck, just pure water transfer. Is this advisable?

    Im just hoping to cycle the tank as quick as I can and allow the fishes a bigger home to play with.

    I know I must be patient and might have to wait anything up to 2 months depending on water parameters so anything that can cut this time will be more pleasing as then I can sell my current tank and recouperate some money back.
     
  2. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    4,428
    Location:
    Leamington Spa, UK.
    What might be best is to move everything over to the new tank in one go. You're filter won't have to work any harder, as you've got the same level of fish stock. In theory you don't even need to move any water. The one thing you need to be cautious of is the temperature of the water, and that you dechlorinate the new water of course ;)

    Also, are you getting a new filter or keeping the existing? If a new filter, you can move all the media from your existing filter into the new.
     
  3. mlgt

    mlgt Member

    Messages:
    1,015
    Location:
    London
    Hi

    Im getting the filter that comes with the 180l. Its been matured for 1 year already and I will add my existing filter into the tank to create more aeration.

    I understand I have to be careful of the tempreture and will leave it to settle for a few days at least.

    So what you are saying is that I dont really need to cycle the water as the filter + my filter should contain enough good bacteria to break down any waste.

    I wont have to worry about parameters as it is kinda considered a massive water change. So as long as I use chemicals to break down chlorine etc it will be fine?
     
  4. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    4,428
    Location:
    Leamington Spa, UK.
    Pretty much, though if you're leaving it for a few days, you might need to be cautious of bacteria die off, as there will be less waste in the water column for the bacteria to survive on.
     
  5. mlgt

    mlgt Member

    Messages:
    1,015
    Location:
    London
    True.

    I picked it up last night and it needs a good clean before I can start to cycle the filter.

    The pads are currently in a bucket of tank water and ive added some of my current "live" tank water and tonight I will start to clean up the tank and remove the gunk at the bottom.

    To do so I simply use some of my "current" tank water to wipe down the sides and remove any algae growth and then I will start to fill up.
     
  6. Ed Seeley

    Ed Seeley Member

    Messages:
    3,262
    Location:
    Nottingham
    You don't cycle tank water at all. What cycling refers to really is a functioning bacterially active filter and tank.

    In your case, if I've read your post correctly you are picking up a tank that has previously had fish in it but is now empty with an integral filter? In this case I would assume that this filter has never been used. In fact, unless you're sure of the source of this tank I would disinfect the tank and kill off anything in there anyway before starting it up!

    What I would do is simply transfer all your stock, water and existing filter across to the new tank and run it alongside the new filter. As this filter has been supporting all the fish in their current home it will support them fine in their new one. Effectively by transferring the filter you are instantly maturing the tank and it won't need to cycle. Over time the bacterial colony will spread between the new filter and as the fish grow and the biological load increases the bacterial population will increase to support it.
     
  7. mlgt

    mlgt Member

    Messages:
    1,015
    Location:
    London
    Thanks for the advice. I will also add my current filter into the tank.

    Well thank god I dont have to cycle my tank for months on end :)
     

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