Algae in glass corners

dino21

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17 Mar 2020
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Hi,

Expect its a question asked before, but not found it yet.

What is the best method, in situ, to clean the algae off the inside of the glass joints without damaging the silicone seals ?
 

jaypeecee

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21 Jan 2015
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What is the best method, in situ, to clean the algae off the inside of the glass joints without damaging the silicone seals ?

Hi @dino21

You've raised a good question. I've found that a toothbrush may not be 100% effective in removing algae or cyanobacteria from the silicone. Unfortunately, I am unable to suggest a better alternative. Even in an empty tank when I've used potassium permanganate solution (on the toothbrush), it sticks like the proverbial. I even wondered if this algae or cyanobacteria had crept underneath the silicone but my magnifier would tend to suggest otherwise. Perhaps a brush with very fine bristles would work best?

JPC
 

Tim Harrison

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I have the Arthur Koestler book with that title somewhere around the house. Is that what you had in mind?

JPC
Well obviously sort of, perhaps equally esoteric...and perhaps of a similar existential postmodern anti-reductionist philosophy but to do with AI emergence ;)
 

zozo

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16 Apr 2015
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Indeed elbow grease and rub and rub with a brush... You could do this during a water change and spray some peroxide on the joints and let if fizzle for a few minutes. This will kill the algae and it might release a tad easier.

Depending on the type of algae mainly referred to as GSA but it could still be a number of algae sp. some are pretty good at (i believe it is called) calcium carbonate precipitation. This means calcium deposits on the algae and this makes them hard and tough to remove without scratching. Now scratching at the joints is what we like to avoid as much as possible. In some cases spraying small amounts of vinegar and let it soak in for a few minutes could soften the calcium up.

It's actually an issue of waiting too long till it becomes an annoying eyesore, then you are already far too late. Try to be ahead and make it a regular maintenance practice from the very start. And rub the joints at each water change with a cloth damped in vinegar.

Still the joints that stay permanently submerged can't be treated like this and might develop algae build up. This could be decreased with using some peroxide in a syringe and spray it over the joints and brush them.

Both peroxide and white vinegar are products relatively safe to use if used with caution and in very small amounts with common sense. I personally use such a 30ml perfume spray bottle while cleaning.

Another very handy tool i also use is long blunt syringe needle. They come in various lenghts 200 to 500mm at Ebay or Alie.
 
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tiger15

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14 Mar 2018
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Use a battery drive toothbrush in conjunction with H2O2 if you can expose the seam during WC.
 

PARAGUAY

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13 Nov 2013
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It's a consideration when buying a new aquarium Some of the very cheap ones look alright on the outside but the inside seams way to "thick" The best aquariums have a thin seam easier to clean
 

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