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Anubias Snow White melted - will they recover ?

winzdk

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14 Dec 2020
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Denmark
As the title says. And I mean completely melted.
What could I have done wrong ? They got light, co2 and ferts. Some of them glued to rocks, others are fastened using string. Some get a lot of light and some are in shade.
New tank 10 days.
Will they recover ? I know not many have much experience with these yet.

2020-12-18 22.02.46 (Small).jpg


Thanks guys :)
 

Sammy Islam

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12 Mar 2019
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Hertfordshire
As the title says. And I mean completely melted.
What could I have done wrong ? They got light, co2 and ferts. Some of them glued to rocks, others are fastened using string. Some get a lot of light and some are in shade.
New tank 10 days.
Will they recover ? I know not many have much experience with these yet.

View attachment 159176

Thanks guys :)

This happened to all my anubias when i set up my scape. I think it could do both ways, if it all turns to mush then i doubt they will grow back, but if the rhizome remains good then it may regrow.
 

Sammy Islam

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12 Mar 2019
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The problem is, the Snow White comes so small that the rhizome is near non-existent.
Maybe it needs a couple of weeks in the cup before planting ?
I usually leave cups next to the window for like 5 days as long as it's not hot & sunny. They seem to do a lot better once planted/stuck down.
 

Andy Pierce

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27 Nov 2020
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Cambridge, UK
If the whole tank is only 10 days old then unstable water parameters probably didn't help. Maybe wait until things get more settled - put in some easy stuff first and let that get going.
 

Shinobi

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In vitro rhizome plants are very sensitive to ammonia burn/melts. Adding to new tank is almost guaranteed to fail unfortunately
 

Geoffrey Rea

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Had no success with Anubias Snow White in low/mid/high tech or growing emersed just breaching the surface. If it’s possible it certainly alludes most folks including myself. Anubias Pinto variegated is a nice alternative if you really have your heart set on a white plant.

If starting over with an in-vitro pot would go straight to emersed with rhizome and roots in the water to give it its best shot.
 
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In vitro rhizome plants are very sensitive to ammonia burn/melts. Adding to new tank is almost guaranteed to fail unfortunately
Mirrors my experience with tissue culture Bucephalandra ’Mini Needle Leaf’. I got some unhelathy Bucephalandra ’Mini Coin’ (ought to be ‘Super Mini Coin’) some tiny pieces had absolutely no rhizome, but put them in a cup filled with damp aquasoil with some cling film on top and they’ve done very well sending roofs into the soil. I would suggest this method for any immature rhizome plant and you can just repurpose the tissue culture cup.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Had no success with Anubias Snow White in low/mid/high tech or growing emersed just breaching the surface. If it’s possible it certainly alludes most folks including myself. Anubias Pinto variegated is a nice alternative if you really have your heart set on a white plant.
I just think it is a chlorophyll issue. If Anubias barteri "Snow White" doesn't have any chlorophyll you could <"only keep it as a "parasite"> on a normal bit of green Anubias barteri. Because Anubias spp. are monocotyledon, you can't graft them, so you would be reliant on having something like "Pinto" and hoping that it threw some branches without chlorophyll.

You can graft dicotyledons, which is how they create those grotesque "moon" cacti.

moon-cactus-400x300.jpg


cheers Darrel
 

Tim Harrison

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I think I remember a similar novelty variety knocking around a few years back and that didn't do very well either. Like Darrel said lack of chlorophyll pretty much means you're going to be hard pressed keeping this alive, let alone actually growing submersed.
 

Hyder

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30 Dec 2020
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I’ve been doing some reading on growing Snow White as I’m getting a new batch soon. Based on the research done on albino plants, it seems like feeding the plant glucose solution may help it to grow? I’m going to try with 0.3 mol of sugar water solution on some and grow it emersed to try it out. Any thoughts?
 

Tim Harrison

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My immediate thought is, why? Nurseries are charging a fortune for something that will inevitably perish, since it's obviously not viable under normal growing conditions.
But if you're determined to give it a go emersed my guess would be that it'd need very strong light and very high humidity to even stand a chance of surviving regardless of what and how you fed it.
 

sparkyweasel

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Nurseries are charging a fortune for something that will inevitably perish,
Then you blame yourself, buy another one and try again, and again, then give up and buy a different plant. Four sales instead of one. Of course, I may be looking at it in a cynical way, but I can't think of a better reason.
 

sparkyweasel

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I’ve been doing some reading on growing Snow White as I’m getting a new batch soon. Based on the research done on albino plants, it seems like feeding the plant glucose solution may help it to grow? I’m going to try with 0.3 mol of sugar water solution on some and grow it emersed to try it out. Any thoughts?
That sound like a good plan. Also I read somewhere that the rhizome and roots are sometimes green and capable of photosynthesis; but that small amount of chlorophyll needs a lot of light to make a useful contribution.
 

sparkyweasel

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Is this true of other epiphites?
It isn't an issue if they have normal green leaves. It's just with the white variety having almost no chlorophyll, so what little it has needs to work hard to feed the whole plant. And if it's in the rhizome, it will be shaded by the leaves and so it will only get a small amount of the light going in to the tank.
 
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