Are you an Iwagumi fan?

beeky

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Dave Spencer said:
As for the “jungle” look….is this an aquascape? :? Supply a tank, water lights, substrate and ferts, then buy a mix of plants off eBay and stick them in the tank and watch them become overgrown.

Reading between the lines, are “jungles” for those that can`t aquascape (no offence :D ), or is it a genuine type of scape? I`m not convinced.

Blimey, you're not shy of controversy are you?! :lol:

You're wrong anyway. Is an Iwagumi a proper scape? Supply a (more expensive) optiwhite tank, (more expensive) glassware, luminaire, Aquasoil Amazonia, stick 3 stones in at different angles, buy a few pots of HC for the front and a few pots of hairgrass for the back, chuck some embers in and your done, dosing your ADA Jaunty Lights, or whatever they're called, every day. After 3 months chuck it away and do it all again with some other stones.

Good jungle scapes are infinitely harder due to their longevity and therefore require more maintenance and dedication.

Your turn! :D
 

JamesC

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I like originality best regardless of what type of scape it is. Iwagumi's are ok but there is only so much you can do with 3 stones. Most are pretty boring IMHO but every now and again a really good one comes along with a slight twist on the theme.

Looking at the competitions most of the scapes that do really well are those that have new ideas and not just a copy of something else that has gone before. Peter Kirwan's mountain scape is a brilliant example of originality and one of the reasons it has done so well. This is also a good reason for keeping scapes secret until the competition.

Out of all the different types of scapes, Dutch style is by far the best :D . Full of colour and texture. Most people seem to like the trendy nature scapes these days, which look pretty but often don't have much of a lifespan and need redoing every so often.

James
 

Mark Evans

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JamesC said:
Peter Kirwan's mountain scape is a brilliant example of originality and one of the reasons it has done so well. This is also a good reason for keeping scapes secret until the competition.

zigs is a copy i believe. it was done before.
 

Steve Smith

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saintly said:
JamesC said:
Peter Kirwan's mountain scape is a brilliant example of originality and one of the reasons it has done so well. This is also a good reason for keeping scapes secret until the competition.

zigs is a copy i believe. it was done before.

Wasn't it a re-work of his own tank from a previous year? Don't quote me on that! ;)
 

Mark Evans

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i've seen a similar tank in an old aqua journal. someone at the green machine pointed out the it was done before pete attempted it
 

a1Matt

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Yep, Pete did do Mountainscape v1 and v2. I wonder if Pete saw the original one first or 'discovered' his v1 independantly?

Personally I love all the styles, I appreciated tanks long before I knew there were even terms for the different styles, let alone new what the terms were. As has been said already it is more about how well you do it than the style it is in.

I'm loving the banter between Dave and Beeky :lol:
 

Garuf

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Yeah, mountain scapes are common, the thank was even called mountain scape v2 it was a rework in a larger tank.
The first iwagumi I saw was a mountain scape infact a good 2 years ago, not to take it away from Zig, his is impeccably well executed. Look how many mountain scapes there were in the comp the same year as zigs...
 

a1Matt

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The thing with Petes is it actually looks like a mountain to me (as oppossed to a tank in the style of a mountain if you see what I mean). Sorry for the OT.
 

Dave Spencer

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beeky said:
Blimey, you're not shy of controversy are you?! :lol:

You`ve got my number Graham! :lol:

beeky said:
You're wrong anyway. Is an Iwagumi a proper scape? Supply a (more expensive) optiwhite tank, (more expensive) glassware, luminaire, Aquasoil Amazonia, stick 3 stones in at different angles, buy a few pots of HC for the front and a few pots of hairgrass for the back, chuck some embers in and your done, dosing your ADA Jaunty Lights, or whatever they're called, every day. After 3 months chuck it away and do it all again with some other stones.

Ah!! Touchee!

beeky said:
...dosing your ADA Jaunty Lights...

:lol: :lol: :lol:

beeky said:
Good jungle scapes are infinitely harder due to their longevity and therefore require more maintenance and dedication.

I have done both and safely say that an Iwagumi is tougher to scape. Jungles just need the ability to grow plants. You don`t even need a foreground, do you?

As for originality, I think it is difficult to achieve in any genre of aquascaping. For those of you with the IAPLC 2004 book, P.13 could well have been a significant influence in Zig`s mountain scape.

Dave.
 

beeky

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It all depends on the definition of jungle I suppose. Is a jungle carefully maintained to give the appearance of a natural, but beautiful underwater scene, or is it a haphazard collection of swords and vallis from the LFS, left to go unruly.

I like lots of plants in a tank, enough to the give the fish somewhere to hide but still allow them to have a good swim. That way it keeps the interest as you can't see everything in one go. Anyone who watches gardening programmes will know what I mean; they're always banging on about "journey" and planting/placing things to hide what's going on to intice you to go exploring. That's why "path" scapes work so well. They lead the eye down and round the tank, giving a "journey".

Strewth, that's the most posting I've done for ages......
 

JohnC

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Hi,

i'm a fan of a good iwagumi but i'm also a huge fan of the base concepts of japanese and zen art and living that go into their creation.

Wabi Sabi all the way baby.

When i did my initial reading on Iwagumi there was alot of chat about how the iwagumi tanks were more difficult to maintain then "standard" planted tanks due to things like the lack of fast growning stems to control algae etc.

Personally i've not found this to be the case and i've not seen too many Iwagumi journals on here or other forums dominated by people's algae disasters. Part of this is probably due to fact that "scapers" who get into Iwagumi tend to be on the more experienced side of things and know about EI, algae control, plant deficiencies.

I'd agree with the previous post on jungle tanks, id say they were harder to keep everything growing well and maintain, especially with the variety of different species and their needs in the same water (i didnt enjoy stems in my big tank at all).

I'd say the initial effort and thinking that goes into the hardscape arrangement of Iwagumi is obviously much harder then jungle as franky this is the majority of the tank in many repects. But at the same time is huge part of the joy of Iwagumi, get it right and you have something magical that will be a cornerstone of any room it sits in.

Best Regards,

John

p.s I noticed the glassware reference by George in the blog on PF and chuckled.
 

George Farmer

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Wow! I forgot about this thread.

I'm a fan of any 'scape that's pleasing to my eye. That can be an overgrown jungle, a strict Dutch layout, or a minimalist Iwagumi - and anything in-between.

Even if a 'scape has be 'done' before, I can still appreciate it. Innovations are great, but I think there's a case for a style's evolution too.

I think Peter's Mountainscape V2 broke new boundaries with the use of the rocky foreground. Amano agrees too and thought it should have won both the 2008 IAPLC and 2008 AGA. Copies generally don't receive such high accolade... ;)

I'm looking forward to unveiling my latest Iwagumi 'scape. Now that is a 'copy'...
 

Dave Spencer

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What do you think to the outcome of the blog, George? It seems iwagumis are cruel and unhealthy for fish. :(

Dave.
 

Garuf

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I think to suggest it's cruel and unhealthy is something of a misnomer, I have bred fish in what many would describe as a iwagumi, I never had any issues with fish scattering for cover either and this is with the tank committing the cardinal sin of being next to a door. I'd also suggest they provided you pick river fish (danio's etc) that it's more natural and healthy in terms of water condition and fish conditioning than a tank with low filtration, low flow, a cement castle, low levels of oxygen and high levels of toxins.
 

GreenNeedle

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I think As Dave says in the blog. There is no problem with fish in an Iwagumi as long as they are the right fish for the setup.

For the others to say that they are bad for fish is like comparing them to the ebay tanks with 6inch per gallon and a teeny filter :)

Saying that I do agree with many of the other comments. I much prefer a tank to look like an underwater scene than a landscape. I would say however that compare to your standard 'non Iwagumi' nature style there are many Iwagumis that do look like they could be underwater or landscape. I gues on those the viewer can decide which or indeed if they could be both.

AC
 

Dave Spencer

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I agree that an an aquascape should actually look as if it is underwater, too. There are some stunning landscapes done underwater, such as Felipe Oliveira`s trees, but they just don`t quite ring true to me.

None of my tanks have really mimicked an underwater scene; I guess a biotype is what is needed for this. Landscapes and terrestrial plants and trees influence me, but I don`t copy them directly in to an underwater scape, although my struggling 60cm is the closest I have come to having a scape that looks positively terrestrial.

Dave.
 
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