Climber ideas

mort

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Hi, I know a lots of us on here enjoy our gardens as much as our tanks, so was wondering what you might consider putting in this particular situation. The site is south west sheltered by two walls. So it will be very protected, warm but possibly dry (I will water until its established). I would like a climber that covers a decent amount of the house. There are a few species I've considered but would ideally like something that establishes fast. I mainly thought a wisteria but had considered campsis radicans (I know it's borderline hardy and I'd really prefer something that was fully hardy) or even a climbing rose. So open to your suggestions.

TIA
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Campsis is a funny one, it either likes you or it doesn't. I've got three, one is on a west wall at work and it flowers and grows pretty well, one is on a west wall but has some competition from other climbers, it is OK and flowers some years and one in Corsham on a SE wall and <"that has never flowered">. They were all root suckers from the same plant, so it isn't genetic.

This is the
IMG_0001.JPG
"flowering one" at work.

I'd suggest a couple "scramblers" that have done well in Corsham <"Trachelospermum jasminoides"> and Clematis cirrhosa (Freckles). They are both very good growers, I've tried another couple of C. cirrhosa cultivars, but they aren't as hardy.

IMG_0013.JPG


They are both growing it the back of our house (it is a variegated Trachelospermum) with Azara serrata, Abutilon megapoticum, Myrtus communis, Jasminium humile"Revolutum" and Roses "Lady Hillingdon Climbing" and "Aloha".

cheers Darrel
 
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mort

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Grapes. At my house they reach the roof. They are bomb proof, with a little sensible pruning. Height can easily reach 30 foot in 5 years.
I am actually planning a grape near there but hadn't considered it for the spot I'm asking about. It's basically the back of the house with next doors conservatory coming out and it's this wall I was going to grow a grape. This is actually at my brothers house but he only lives 4 doors down. Luckily he has no real interest in the garden apart from trying to get as much wildlife in there. I have two grape vines, black hamburg and chardonnay and was thinking one of the strawberry grapes might be good for the conservatory wall.
 

mort

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Thanks Darrel, the campsis was really a suggestion because I walk past one everyday when walking the dog and the last few years there has been more red from the flowers than green. I'm guessing if they are hardy in Bath then they shouldn't be to bad here in norwich and the one round the corner looks a few years old from its size.

Is the abutilon hardy? I have 6 18" high one that I think are Kentish belle, that I grew from cuttings taken last November and I didn't think they were reliably hardy so was going to overwinter a couple in the greenhouse for security.

I've got quite a lot of vertical real estate to cover so I'll look at your other suggestion as well but I'm happy to hear anymore suggestion anyone may have.
 

zozo

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I have quite a few climbers in the garden and around the house... :) Can't pick a favourite, love 'm all equally as much.

Most common the Hedera, the evergreen spider farm. :) A true killer...

Virginia creeper, beautiful, but nasty and rather dirty, not evergreen and loads of dark red berries the birds love. (A fly-in and a poop-out on the pavement). Goes bonkers if not kept in check, can destroy a roof.

Passiflora, absolutely gorgeous and in mild winters an evergreen. Grows like a champion all over the place pasionate with lovely flowers.

The Vitis Blue Boskoop Glory Grape, i choose this one because it seems to be the best blue grape for European climate not susceptible to mildew fungus. And it didn't disappoint in over 10 years. To make it culinary functionally, it needs a sunny spot and a lot of trimming. And each summer you are guaranteed busy for hours making gallons of sweet Blue Grape Jam. (I do.) But needs a vigorous maintenance cut back each year over again. During and after the growing season.

Climbing Hydrangea, this is a climber that has a stunning hidden Bonsai potential. If trimmed regularly and correctly at the lower parts and let the upper parts spread out. Its wooden stem is comparable with Grape and can grow in intriguing shapes.

Clematis, too much to name them all, gorgeous flowers, but also rather maintenance demanding plant...

If i had a bigger garden i had more, but i don't. :)

 
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dw1305

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Hi all,
he campsis was really a suggestion because I walk past one everyday when walking the dog and the last few years there has been more red from the flowers than green. I'm guessing if they are hardy in Bath then they shouldn't be to bad here in norwich
More likely to do well in Norwich than with me. I don't think they mind a cold winter if they get a good summer. I've seen them in Europe (in Lyon and near Lake Constance (Meersburg)) where it must be cold in the winter, but has a warm summer. Whatever it says in the book they are easy to root as semi-hardwood cuttings and sucker fairly freely as well.
Is the abutilon hardy? I have 6 18" high one that I think are Kentish belle, that I grew from cuttings taken last November and I didn't think they were reliably hardy
"Cynthia Pike"/"Kentish Belle/" isn't very hardy, I've had it a couple of times, but it has never lasted longer than a couple of years, it has a bigger flower than A. megapoticum. Of the ones I've grown Abutilon vitifolium/ochsenii /x suntense is the hardiest, followed by A. megapoticum.
Clematis, too much to name them all, gorgeous flowers, but also rather maintenance demanding plant...
I've had mixed luck with them. I've got another couple of big early flowering evergreen ones C. armandii. and C. clarkeana/urophylla "Winter Beauty", they have good foliage. Clematis cartmanii "Avalanche" didn't like the winter here.

There are a few roses that would do Rosa banksiae "Lutea" is the classic choice. I also like Fremontodendron 'California Glory' and Eriobotrya japonica (Loquat).

cheers Darrel
 

zozo

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I have 1 more I almost forgot. :) The Five-Leaf Chocolate Vine. A climber that can absolutely take a beating in a very dark spot and keeps coming back. I have it growing from an old Milk Jug in a shaded corner and i neglect it regularly.

I'm sure its an absolute stunner if placed with care.

I've had mixed luck with them.
I have totally forgotten which ones i have, but very lucky with both... The guide said they require a regular trim back, but i never do. Just let them grow wild and they are coming back each year flowering like mad. And both are standing rather shaded, i remember picking them for that reason. Labelled as growing partially Sunny/Semi shaded.. :)
 
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Simon Cole

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I have two grape vines, black hamburg and chardonnay and was thinking one of the strawberry grapes might be good for the conservatory wall.
Bob Flowerdue is the leading expert on grapes in the UK. He recommends two very distinct varieties: Siegerrebe and Boskoop Glory. I have grown the latter, and 'Vroege van der Laan'. He wrote a great article here, but all of his grape articles are worth a quick read before you jump in.
 

mort

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Bob Flowerdue is the leading expert on grapes in the UK.
Thanks Simon, I will give it a read.
My mum went to school with Bob. Not very relevant but she says he hasn't changed much.

I have quite a few climbers in the garden and around the house... :) Can't pick a favourite, love 'm all

If i had a bigger garden i had more, but i don't. :)

Thanks Zozo, I'm quite lucky in having two gardens to play with so I have most of your suggestions already.

Virginia creeper on my brothers house and garage as well as intertwining my front fence.

Passionflower, I have a couple down the side of my house under where I'm training an American wisteria.

Clematis, a few dotted around the gardens but want to get a few more.

Climbing hydrangea, I a couple of young ones growing slowly but have this one on the front of my house

20180601_140706.jpg


I also have various jasmine and honeysuckles dotted around the place plus the two grape vines. I basically see any vertical surface as an extention of the garden, given how small city gardens are.
 

mort

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"Cynthia Pike"/"Kentish Belle/" isn't very hardy, I've had it a couple of times, but it has never lasted longer than a couple of years, it has a bigger flower than A. megapoticum. Of the ones I've grown Abutilon vitifolium/ochsenii /x suntense is the hardiest, followed by A. megapoticum.
Thanks Darrel, I'll check out all your suggestions. As to the abutilon I'm just assuming it was Kentish belle through my simple Google abutilon, oh it looks like that first picture, method. It might well be A. megapoticum as it was "borrowed" from a piece that snapped off someone's in the wind. I found it lying in an alley where the plant reached over the six foot fences so assumed it had been there a good few years. My neighbour has one and I think all the ones in the area come from that same plant. As I have six I'll keep a couple and pass the others on but overwinter one in the greenhouse or take some more cuttings if it gets to a reasonable size.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Hydrangea petiolaris is nice.
As to the abutilon I'm just assuming it was Kentish belle through my simple Google abutilon, oh it looks like that first picture, method. It might well be A. megapoticum as it was "borrowed" from a piece that snapped off someone's in the wind.
Abutilon (and Jasminium) spp are great as a cutting. I've had my eye on a stray bit of Jasminum officinale "Clotted Cream" in Bath, but I don't really have anywhere to put it.

I've had both "Kentish Belle" and "Cynthia Pike", and they were very similar. This is what <"Fred Pike"> (brother of the eponymous Cynthia) says
I do not have Kentish Belle in my garden (readily available now in good garden centres and nurseries - at a price!), but I do have Cynthia Pike, a better progeny, although slightly more tender, and not readily available. Having said that, A x Cynthia Pike in my garden here in South Devon, has thrived outside, for a good few years and some harder winters, although it has to be said, up against a south facing wall.
Abutilon megapoticum has a <"smaller, "crisper" red and yellow flower"> than either of the others.

cheers Darrel
 

mort

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I had to go to the hardware store and they had a couple of clematis, so I ended up coming out with a clematis orientalis. Looks a decent choice to start the mix as it's late flowering, good for pollinators and the birds like the fluffy seed heads. Still looking at the suggestions above for when I go to a proper garden centre, after everything settles down a bit.
 
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