Co2 safe bottle for dosing unit?

Jonatk

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I'm hooking up a dosing unit to my tank. I'm thinking of using a normal plastic water bottle with a sports type noozle on it, the type you can buy in any corner shop. Just because its cheep, or a cycling water bottle. Are these types of bottle safe for liquid Co2
 

Jonatk

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An autodosing unit. I'm going to use the bottles to store the pre mixed liquids in. One for liquid co2, macro and micro ferts
 

dino21

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If you look on the base of your actual liquid Co2 bottle it should have a symbol with a number in it, that tells your what type of plastic it is and its typical use, so use a bottle that has the same or compatible markings.

000366.jpg
 

hypnogogia

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Ah, ok, I get you. Anything food safe should be fine. I do know from experience that some of those sports water bottles to male the water taste plasticy, so I’d keep away from those.
 

Jonatk

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OK then, after some looking around at the bases of plastic bottles in the house, I have found a match for the plastic used in the liquid carbon bottle (HDPE2), a shampoo bottle. So my question now is, is it safe to use an empty shampoo bottle if its been rinsed properly?
 

Simon Cole

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Shampoo bottle - no very safe. Unexpected derivatives almost certain, probably even if cleaned due to plastic adsorption. Volatiles more possible.

Exposure to volatile chemical has some hypothetical risk:

In occupational settings where personal or workplace air sampling was performed, self-reported respiratory tract symptoms following short-term exposures occurred at concentrations as low as 0.012–0.17 ppm (NIOSH 1987a, 1987b; Norbäck 1988; Pisaniello et al. 1997; Vyas et al. 2000). See Table 8-1 for information regarding occupational exposure limits for glutaraldehyde. Information regarding occupational exposure to glutaraldehyde and respiratory sensitization is discussed in Section 3.2.1.3 (Immunological and Lymphoreticular Effects). Studies in animals identify the upper respiratory tract as a particularly sensitive target of glutaraldehyde toxicity following inhalation exposure. Single 4–8-hour exposure of rats to saturated atmospheres of glutaraldehyde vapor (generated at 21–25°C) resulted in clinical signs of respiratory tract irritation during exposure (Ballantyne 1995; Union Carbide Corp. 1992c, 1992d);...

see: https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/ToxProfiles/tp208.pdf around page 30. Note temperature and ppms.

Recommend: Air tight enclosure. Spill proofed encapsulation. Lock. Warning sign. Making household and guests aware.
 

Jonatk

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7 Jan 2018
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Thanks Simon.
Wow, just read some of that Tox profile. The only warning on the bottle is keep out of reach of children. Im probably going to be a bit more careful with it from now on.

I also just got a reply from Easy Life.

"Thank you for your interest in our Easy Life products.

EasyCarbo can be stored in glass or plastic containers. As long as the UV is filtered out (that’s almost always the case), it doesn’t matter which kind of plastic or glass bottle is being used.
"

So it looks like I'll be using a dark coloured cycling water bottle as I am wall mounting them within a cupboard .
 

Simon Cole

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Cool. I wouldn't worry too much about what the resellers think. They never seem to include the right safety information. My glut came in a squeezy bottle that looked exactly like hand wash, with the green (safe) push down nozzle. It had colourful pictures of plants allover it. You can only imagine how dangerous this is to children that cannot read. There was no child safety lock. Even if they could read "easy carbon" it would probably sound safe and natural to them. My grandmother is also blind and I used to drink, so you can imagine how dangerous these bottles soon become. All plastic containers are not equal. You need one that will not let any vapour escape. Some plastics are rather unsuitable, so I think their advice was also wrong. They were probably not qualified to make these assertions. I would glue the bottle in place so that it cannot tip over or use a secondary containment, and use extra screws in the wall mounting. Use blue butyl gloves and you'll protect your hands. A sign goes a long way in case you have random or uninvited guests that could touch it; police and burglars will raid houses by accident and not know what it is etc. A chain and lock over the cabinet handles is what I do.
 
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