Crypts and Echino, no stems in a Hi tech

Discussion in 'General Planted Tank Discussions' started by jonny_ftm, 1 Jun 2009.

  1. jonny_ftm

    jonny_ftm Member

    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Switzerland
    Hi,

    This is my fisrt post here.

    I have a 60gal tank, 2x54W T5 (+3h 4x54W burst period that I could shut soon to reduce light). Dosing EI + pressurised CO2.

    [​IMG]

    I'm looking to remove all stem plants, except maybe a small group of only one kind for aestetics as a spot.
    I thought replacing all stems with crypts and echino, with added java fern and anubias. This is to reduce maintenance at a maximum: no retopping, no decaying leaves...

    Just wondering if my setup would be a guarantied open door for algae blooms.

    Many thanks for helping me for such an unusual planted tank.
     
  2. rawr

    rawr Member

    Messages:
    604
    Location:
    Enfield
    I think you've got a nice setup and what you want to do is definately achieveable. The key is to do so gradually, maybe replacing spots of plant with low-maintenance/light plants maybe on a monthly basis. You could then reduce the burst of light because it won't really be needed for these type of plants.
     
  3. jonny_ftm

    jonny_ftm Member

    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Switzerland
    Thanks,

    I'll give it a try and adjust the light depending on plants growth and eventual algae
    I could begin with unrooting the front echino, put them in the second plan (instead of the alternantera) and replace the front plan by shorter crypts, would be nicer looking too. I'll begin there so :)
     
  4. a1Matt

    a1Matt Member

    Messages:
    2,498
    Location:
    Bromley
    I think you will be fine with this changeover.

    TIP1 - Follow any disturbances of the substrate with a large water change. If the disturbance is really big, then repeat the water change daily for two or three days.

    By doing the above I have ripped out an entire tank and replanted it in one go with no algae problems.
    The advice of doing it bit by bit is a much better idea though, it makes it easier for you to make adjustments to your lighting\ferts\CO2.

    TIP2 - Monitor your CO2 carefully. If your CO2 is as high as it could be to start with then it is easy to gas your fish by reducing the bioload and not reducing your CO2.

    Hope that helps 8)
     
  5. George Farmer

    George Farmer Founder Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,091
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Hi Jonny, and welcome to UKAPS!

    Your plans sound fine.

    Cut your lighting to 2 x 54w for 6-8hrs and this will help reduce nuisance algae risk.

    Like Matt says, ensure you do a couple of large water changes after pulling up plants, as the disruption in the substrate can be a major algae trigger.
     
  6. jonny_ftm

    jonny_ftm Member

    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Switzerland
    Thank you all for your advices.
    Indeed, usually, I plan these operations on waterchange day then follow by daily WC of 50% too as needed coupled to filter cleaning of last synthetic filtering moss.

    Thanks also for reminding me about CO2 and light, can never be enough reminded.

    Usually also, I pull the echino/crypts rather than uprooting them to minimize pollution and mixing of substrate/gravel layers

    About stem plants, I planned to cut them under the gravel without unrooting, thinking that the remaining underground parts will constitute ferts for other plants and some food for my trumpet snails. Is it a good idea to do so?
     
  7. GreenNeedle

    GreenNeedle Member

    Messages:
    2,706
    Location:
    Lincoln UK
    Anything you leave in the substrate WILL more than likely grow again no matter who (including Tropica) tell you it will rot down!!!

    I used to have some Nymphea in my tank and removed all the bulbs. Some tiny roots must have remained and I now have to pull baby Nymphea plants every month or so!!!

    When pulling plants with huge root systems like Echinodorus/Crypts/Nymphea you can either pull it half an inch and then slacken to let the substrate fill in then keep repeating until the whole root system is out. This however is not easy and can always leave some bits and pieces behind.

    From experience I would always from now on remove all the plants, replace substrate and then replant (although I never follow my own advice ;) )

    Welcome to UKaps Jonny

    AC
     
  8. a1Matt

    a1Matt Member

    Messages:
    2,498
    Location:
    Bromley
    I rekcon this is one of those questions that poeple will debate both sides for.
    Me personally I'd pull 'em up completely.
     
  9. jonny_ftm

    jonny_ftm Member

    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Switzerland
    Thank you SuperColey1 for the feedback of your expierience,

    I recall now having removed that way all my H. Polysperma and after 2 months I saw new stems of them growing. They're now again nice growing

    I'll think at it, I really hate seeing the soil going in the water and depositing on plants

    I'll feedback when done, in few weeks. The uprooted stems will go in my future nano to cycle it quickier

    Thank you all again for the great help
     
  10. GreenNeedle

    GreenNeedle Member

    Messages:
    2,706
    Location:
    Lincoln UK
    If your water goes cloudy from uprooting stick an internal filter filled with floss in for a few days to trap the particles. Easier than opening up the cannister to put it in then opening it up to remove etc ;)

    AC
     
  11. jonny_ftm

    jonny_ftm Member

    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Switzerland
    Thanks again for the idea indeed :)

    I'll let you know how it will go
     

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