Cyanobacteria kill elephants

LondonDragon

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Not sure we get that kind of algae in our tanks, but sucking into a hose is never a good idea regardless lol

This is also common sense as blue-green algae is toxic to most animals and every summer you have to remember to be careful where your dogs swim also, as this will also kill them.
 

Tim Harrison

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I always stuff the end of the hose in the lily pipe outlet before i turn the filter off. That gets the water flowing and then gravity does the rest. No sucking needed ;)
 

X3NiTH

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Cyanobacteria is being increasingly implicated as a factor for long term neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, CJD and others. The body can incorporate genes from it which codes for misfolding Tau proteins leading to long term damage and eventual death.

There’s more to this of course but it’s not surprising considering that it’s the original extremophile that ushered in all other life by its exceptional ability to scavenge nutrition.

Poor Elephants, Very Fast Death Factor in action!

:(
 

tiger15

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Cyanobacteria is being increasingly implicated as a factor for long term neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, CJD and others. The body can incorporate genes from it which codes for misfolding Tau proteins leading to long term damage and eventual death.

There’s more to this of course but it’s not surprising considering that it’s the original extremophile that ushered in all other life by its exceptional ability to scavenge nutrition.

Poor Elephants, Very Fast Death Factor in action!

:(
Cyanobacteria is photosynthetic bacteria, not Extremophiles that belong to a different and more primintive group of bacteria called Archaea. The chloroplasts in green plants originated from symbiosis fusion of CB into algae that later evolved into advanced plants. CB can release toxins, but I am not aware that CB can be parasitic.
 

X3NiTH

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I know it’s not an extremophile per se but the environment in which it evolved was extreme to say the least and nutrient scavenging became its forte which is where the danger lies, BMAA particularly.
 

alto

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Note this was/is an assumption - no conclusive evidence was actually found (no mention as to why specific tests were not done)
 

X3NiTH

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Because Cyano is exceptional at scavenging metals with toxic consequences I’m going to hazard a guess that these elephants drank from a water source that has been polluted with heavy metals, particularly mercury which is used for recovery in artisanal gold mining which Botswana has a long history with!

The Cyanobacteria/Mercury combination is devastatingly neurodegenerative, each on their own have their own dangers but together it’s a neurological bomb, it’s implicated in Sporadic CJD (I’ve tried really hard but I’ve never been able to rediscover the paper), if you think about that combination long and hard enough you can join a few dots together, thankfully were saying goodbye to coal!

Stumbling Elephants, not the first to fall on their face and probably not the last!

:(
 
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