DIY Stand. What do you think?

Discussion in 'Hardware & DIY' started by sisko, 5 Nov 2008.

  1. sisko

    sisko Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    London, UK
    Ok, I've built this one in the afternoon. All my measurements worked out well so I'm quite pleased :D

    My question is do you think it's strong enough to hold a RIO 180? I still have 2 other legs which supposed to go in the middle, but I rather leave that space opened.
    Here are the pics:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The sides and doors are still missing and I'm going to place a 1.5 cm thick chipboard on the top. It looks really massive, but I just don't know!!!
    Oh yeah, the timber is 89x38 mm
     
  2. JamesM

    JamesM Member

    Messages:
    1,913
    Location:
    The BIG End, South Wales
    That's stud work timer, right?

    That should be fine mate :) I've built loads of stuff with stud work timber :lol: My local Wickes love me I'm there so much :lol:

    I'd add some 45 degree cross bracing though, just to beef it up some more. There is no such thing as overkill :D
     
  3. Mark Evans

    Mark Evans Expert

    Messages:
    6,492
    Location:
    newark notts.
    yep, traingles mate, thats where its at. looks good. don't forget the centre strength
     
  4. sisko

    sisko Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    London, UK
    It's called CLS Timber and yes Wickes rules!!! :lol:
    The 45 degree is a good idea, but don't really want anything in the front.
     
  5. JamesM

    JamesM Member

    Messages:
    1,913
    Location:
    The BIG End, South Wales
    One 45 at the back, and one at one side with be fine mate. That'll lock it in place and make it rigid.

    You could double up on the front and back top rails, then you should be ok without a centre leg.

    How are you going to clad it? Or aren't you?
     
  6. sisko

    sisko Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    London, UK
    Clad? Do you mean cover it? Or treat it? I'll get some chipboard from homebase, they have more colours than Wickes and it's even closer :D
     
  7. JamesM

    JamesM Member

    Messages:
    1,913
    Location:
    The BIG End, South Wales
    Yeah, cover it up... If you use structural ply wood, you wouldn't need any 45 degree braces as the clad with hold it together. You can be picky about it too, because some sheets have really nice grain that looks great when stained and protected. Yes, I'm a woodwork junkie. Norm Abram is my hero.

    [edit] http://www.wickes.co.uk/Sheet-Exterior- ... nvt/110036

    A quick sand and this stuff looks awesome! :)
     
  8. sisko

    sisko Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    London, UK
    How does the "structural ply wood" look like? Is it the one with the big chips? :D
    I want one layer on the top and one on the bottom of the top frame. That should hold it. Should.... :?
     
  9. sisko

    sisko Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    London, UK
    Great!! Thanks James, I'll post a pic of the finished cabinet! ;)
     
  10. JamesM

    JamesM Member

    Messages:
    1,913
    Location:
    The BIG End, South Wales
    Nah, that's OSB (http://www.wickes.co.uk/Sheet-OSB/Orien ... nvt/110024). Great if you want to then cover that up with something else - I built a shed from it once, then clad that in shiplap cladding. Will last a lifetime, but its butt-ugly. Like so: http://img.diytrade.com/cdimg/482241/54 ... /OSB_3.jpg

    You can get different grades of ply wood, like exterior, and spruce. This has a nice natural grain, like so: http://www.tri-valley.k12.il.us/sjones/plywood.jpg

    Exterior tends to be rougher and will require more work, but resists water quite well (to a point).
     
  11. bugs

    bugs Member

    Messages:
    365
    How do you plan to finish it - paint, varnish? MDF is very good for painting if it's done well with a good primer coat. I'd go for moisture resistant and put some coats of paint on before fixing (to be sure all edges are sealed) and then a finishing coat. (Beware of the dust with MDF though :twisted: ...). If you're not painting then Birch faced ply is good. You would probably get away with 9mm thick as it is side forces that you managing.
     
  12. sisko

    sisko Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    London, UK
    Don't really now yet. I was gonna use 15mm chipboard for the sides and the top, pre-made doors on the front. Found some good ones at Wickes, but they around £10 each. James made me thinking with the plywood. I'll try to go back this week and look around.
    Chipboard is good, cos they can cut it to size, don't have to bother with painting and looks ok. The only problem you can't get it in black ANYWHERE!!
    I can't do much diy at home specially not painting!! my workshop is my room! :lol: A few black stains looked odd on the beige carpet! :lol:
     
  13. JamesM

    JamesM Member

    Messages:
    1,913
    Location:
    The BIG End, South Wales
    I'd go with stain over plywood, with a few coats of Danish oil to protect it. Stains come in hundreds of colours too. Each to their own though :)

    I'm adding some wood trim to my tank right now... dark oak and several coats of oil to seal it. The last tank was trimmed in Teak, which is a really nice red.
     
  14. GreenNeedle

    GreenNeedle Member

    Messages:
    2,706
    Location:
    Lincoln UK
    I know you said you don't want anything at the front but if you think about it, then its god to have something where the doors meet at the front and you can fit locks into this piece if required.

    AC
     
  15. sisko

    sisko Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    London, UK
    That's exactly what I was thinking about this morning with a coffee in my hand. :D
    I'm going to put a leg in in the front and 2 45 degrees at the back so it stays kind of opened. Still dunno about the cladding. I've seen some good ideas on another forum, but haven't got the tools! :mad: I guess I'm gonna have to try my best with a handsaw and a screwdriver! :lol: You can achieve a lot with plywood and some nice coloured finish, but the simplicity of the furniture board attracts me.
     
  16. GreenNeedle

    GreenNeedle Member

    Messages:
    2,706
    Location:
    Lincoln UK
    You could just get Jackson Shipley to cut some nice pine into the exact sizes you want and screw them to the outisde of the frame. Pine looks great stained.

    AC
     
  17. Goodygumdrops

    Goodygumdrops Member

    Messages:
    278
    Location:
    Falkirk,Scotland
    I've got panels of that fake tongue and groove stuff you get out of b&q on the walls in my kitchen.It's lightweight and comes in manageable sized sheets,easy to work with and would finish it off great.
    Bit of that,bit of moulding round the edge,paint it up,Bob's yer uncle.
     
  18. JazzyJeff

    JazzyJeff Member

    Messages:
    77
    Location:
    hants
    I had a 5x2x2 sat on a DIY stand very similar, I used pine T&G on the sides, premade pine doors and some nice moldings and a few coats of Light Oak Stain and it looked awesome !!!!!
     
  19. bugs

    bugs Member

    Messages:
    365
    (If you do decide to use oil don't leave the rags bunched up in a ball... The can ignite spontaneously...)
     
  20. JamesM

    JamesM Member

    Messages:
    1,913
    Location:
    The BIG End, South Wales
    Good point :) It can be very hazardous leaving them scrunched up :!:

    You can brush oil on too :)
     

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