HELP!

Discussion in 'Hardware & DIY' started by Tucker90, 29 Jan 2019.

  1. Tucker90

    Tucker90 Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Derby
    So I’ve restored and strengthened (I can stand on top of it and weigh 95kg) this tall boy ready for my tank,

    [​IMG]


    I live in a 200 cottage with what I thought were fairly level floors, they are not, by a long shot...

    Can I use self levelling legs? Shall I just buy a proper unit?! Or should I avoid it at all costs and find somewhere else for the tank on level floors?




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  2. Matt @ ScapeEasy

    Matt @ ScapeEasy Member

    Messages:
    501
    Location:
    Lancaster
    Would you be willing to shorten the required legs of the unit? You could shorten them all to level out again should you need to?
     
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  3. Siege

    Siege Member

    Messages:
    383
    Location:
    Huntingdon, UK
    Looks fantastic!

    You could use shims or piece of wood under the uneven legs. I’m rubbsh at diy but can you get screw in levelling feet?

    Even if you buy a ready made stand, most wont come with self levelling legs. Perhaps a simple mod to what you have made would be good?
     
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  4. Tucker90

    Tucker90 Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Derby
    Thanks! Took quite a bit of doing! Yeah they are two possibilities! Not sure how stable it’d be!


    That was my first thought I can do it easily! Would just be worried how accurate I could actually get it!


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  5. Siege

    Siege Member

    Messages:
    383
    Location:
    Huntingdon, UK
    At AG the floors are a nightmare, we have plastic shim things under just about all the tanks!
     
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  6. oscarlloydjohn

    oscarlloydjohn Member

    Messages:
    189
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    I use small wooden shims under my stands, since our house is victorian and nowhere near level :)
     
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  7. Matt @ ScapeEasy

    Matt @ ScapeEasy Member

    Messages:
    501
    Location:
    Lancaster
    Do you have any of those felt pads for going under furniture legs... that might help smooth out small inaccuracies...
     
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  8. Tucker90

    Tucker90 Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Derby
    Sounds similar! Don’t suppose you have a picture for reference?!? Or explain how you’ve done it?!




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  9. Tucker90

    Tucker90 Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Derby
    I’ve got a fair bit of height to play with! We’re talking half an inch, but finishing with some of these will work a treat! Thanks


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  10. Tucker90

    Tucker90 Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Derby
    Sounds good! I’ve got about half an inch to take care of! Think I’ll be able to do it?!


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  11. jagillham

    jagillham Member

    Messages:
    323
    Location:
    Kent (UK)
    Plywood is good, strong and won't slip or buckle. Problem is that's not going to look great!

    Where you've set it up, hows the level from front left to front right? Adjustment at the back certainly easier without being unsightly.
     
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  12. Kalum

    Kalum Member

    Messages:
    519
    Location:
    Scotland
    I'd definitely go for hard wood or plastic shims, less chance of settling or compacting over time than fibres

    Or get the wood planer out
     
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  13. Keith GH

    Keith GH Member

    Messages:
    587
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Tucker

    The only way is to pack under the legs to get it the best you can. To get it perfect You can use wedges. Two wedges over lap and as you tap the ends it will lift the unit up.

    [​IMG]

    To make every thing safe I strongly suggest you use a 10-20mm Polystyrene foam under the tank not only will it help with any twisting and floor movement it will stop any floor vibrations for the tank.

    Keith:wave::wave:
     
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  14. Tucker90

    Tucker90 Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Derby
    Unfortunately it’s dipping at the front, so it will look unsightly! I think I need to get the planer out


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  15. Tucker90

    Tucker90 Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Derby
    Thanks Keith!

    I have got some 10mm foam ready, that was always in the plan as there will be some vibrations due to it been on a wooden floor!


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  16. Tucker90

    Tucker90 Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Derby
    The planer will be coming out this week!

    I’ve ordered some plastic shims from screwfix! Will take the majority down with the planer the fine adjust with the shims!




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  17. jagillham

    jagillham Member

    Messages:
    323
    Location:
    Kent (UK)
    If it’s OK left to right, then leaning forwards is not too bad, you can shorten the rear legs.

    I’d mark the floor so you know exactly where the feet go each time you adjust. If using wedges, make sure they have grip on them to prevent spreading, the ones used to space laminate flooring from walls normally do. However any wedge could imprint on your floor, particularly if has smaller ‘footprint’ than the legs.
     
  18. Tucker90

    Tucker90 Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Derby
    The floor is well over 100 years old, and has more marks, scuffs and scratches than I can count so that’s not a problem!

    I’m going to shave the back legs down, then add some felt furniture pads to take away any inaccuracies.

    I will also have some foam for the tank to sit on so they will hopefully absorb any vibrations!

    It’s only 50L tank, plus 20kg of stone... what’s the worse that could happen

    Thanks for your help! And thanks to everyone else for their input!

    Will update when I’ve done said modifications!




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  19. Andrew Butler

    Andrew Butler Member

    Messages:
    1,054
    Location:
    Banbury, Oxfordshire
    Unsure how big the aquarium is but just remember it's not just the weight of the water but also the weight of the glass aquarium itself, also remember over time weighty objects have an effect on things, especially if the weight is more direct like with the legs.
    What I would be most concerned about is the leg circled in red; from what I can see in the photo there seems to be a joists running roughly where the red lines are (I'm sure there will also be one near the wall assuming it's an original stone one) this leg is also near to the edge of the board. If you have a cellar or access underneath you can inspect the board to make sure it is square easily enough and you could also add some noggins to reinforce things; some old floor boards are not square at the edges so have maybe half the thickness. Unsure about the other legs and this is only assuming my red lines are showing joists - looked like nails!

    Unsure of your DIY skill set but planing the end grain of the wood is always a risky business; especially if it as an electric one!
    Regardless of how you go about things it's always worth heavily scoring the wood with a sharp stanley blade to try and prevent splintering before planing.

    Good method using folding wedges

    Just be careful with these; if using a few stacked up they can compress over time, especially stacked up one on top of the other.

    The way I would do things:
    I would think about getting the cabinet in exactly the position you intend, maybe even mark this position with masking tape under the legs as move it an inch or two could completely change things.
    When it's in it's final position put the aquarium on the top and fill it with a couple of inches of water then you can use this to help you get the cabinet level - water is the oldest and still best levelling method,
    with some small packing pieces of anything solid pack the cabinet so the measurement from the top of the tank to the waterline is the same all of the way around then you know it's level.
    measure the largest gap you have between the floor and the bottom of a leg and then find something you can use to then mark this measurement on all of the legs. an offcut of thin wood maybe.
    If you can use this measuring gauge to go around each leg and mark each leg; on all 4 sides if possible as floorboards rarely sit flat and it is doubtful these measurements are square either.
    Whichever way you choose to trim the ends I would recommend using a sharp stanley blade.
    if they are only small amounts I would consider seeing if you have access to a belt sander, for larger amounts trim them with a saw first then sand like above.
    Give the edges a quick sand off.
    I'd consider putting some felt wedges under like @Matt @ ScapeEasy suggests but only after you have trimmed the legs and look for ones that are almost as big as the legs else you are further narrowing the force
    Put the aquarium back in exactly the same place as where you marked it.

    tallboy.jpg
     
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  20. Keith GH

    Keith GH Member

    Messages:
    587
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Tucker

    I am speaking as a Cabinet Maker 10 years then taught the trade at for 26 years.

    Keep in mind if you ever shift that cabinet you will have to re level the legs all over again.

    Not seeing the underneath of the cabinet I would be thinking of removing the legs and rails and making a Plinth and levelling that up its far easier to do.

    Keith:wave::wave:

    [​IMG]
     
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