JBL Aqua In-out

Discussion in 'General Planted Tank Discussions' started by nickyc, 7 May 2008.

  1. nickyc

    nickyc Member

    Messages:
    208
    Location:
    Nottingham
    Has anyone tried JBL Aqua In-out? Have searched for product reviews and come up with nothing at all. Am trying hard not to waste money on useless gadgets but do need to find a solution to hauling buckets so I can save money on physio visits! :rolleyes:
     
  2. ulster exile

    ulster exile Member

    Messages:
    352
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    I looked at these along with the Lee's Ultimate Gravel vac and the Python but ended up ruling them out because I hate things which attach to mixer taps. I instead went for a hose and a pump along the following lines...Not only can I use this for emptying/refilling, I intend on using it to water the garden from the water butt (I have a v. small garden) and I can empty the tank wat directly into the garden.

    Here's a brief idea of how it's done...

    Equipment
    Eheim universal 1250 hobby pump takes 12mm tubing. I initially chose a cheap 400lph pump, but it couldn't cope with the head height - my kitchen has a step down and the difference in height from the sink to the tank was too great for it. The 1250 was a little smaller than what I wanted, but it was a good offer (2nd hand).

    6 metres of eheim 12mm tubing - I chose eheim because I knew I could rely on the size of the tubing and most other tubing (non-aquatic) was too vague on sizes for me to rely on it before buying. The branded stuff was obviously dearer, but I chose reliablility in this instance.

    A 12mm eheim inttake pipe. You could use a shepherd's crook instead, but the U shape is much tighter on the inttake so it fits snugger over the edge of the tank and is less likely to move.

    Some velcro ties to secure the hose when not in use and to secure the inttake to the tap when emptying.

    IMG_0846.jpg

    Emptying
    IMG_0886.jpg

    IMG_0887.jpg

    Refilling
    IMG_0888.jpg

    IMG_0889.jpg

    The pump does have the facility to run out of the water, but the piece needed is missing. I'm ordering a new one (for about £2.50) and when I have it, I hope to make the process a little easier, plus I hope to use this to empty into the water butts in the summer, but also to water the garden from the water butts.

    Of course, it's a relatively simple matter to use a hose attachment from the tap before somebody points it out, but as I have a dislike of tap attachments this is a safer method for me!
     
  3. nickyc

    nickyc Member

    Messages:
    208
    Location:
    Nottingham
    Chrissi you superstar! Thanks for the detail and the pics! We've got a similar problem with the height of the kitchen. I might even be able to adapt this for our marine set up too. If you're running tap water straight in do you add dechorinator directly to the tank? And what do you do about temperature? I normally heat the water before I add.

    Thanks again,
     
  4. ulster exile

    ulster exile Member

    Messages:
    352
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    I add dechlor either direct to the tank or to the bucket in which I sit the pump (since I can't use it out of the water just yet).

    As it is a mixer tap, I try and roughly adjust the water to feel (don't worry too much about temp as long as it isn't freezing cold), but I always go for a colder wc anyway for my corys.
     
  5. LondonDragon

    LondonDragon Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    10,289
    Location:
    London
    I do something very similar to Chrisi, just using normal garden hose which was free and also a pump which I got cheap off ebay.
    Instead of the bucket I use tap connectors which then I don't have to move the pump about. Use some taps on the hose to open and close for emptying and filling.
     
  6. niknaksky

    niknaksky Member

    Messages:
    153
    Location:
    shropshire
    I use a water butt and water butt pump from when i had my 6x2x2 and it makes life alot easier.

    Only use it to put the water back in now as the tanks are not as big but it still saves using buckets and spilling water on the carpet.
     
  7. Wolfenrook

    Wolfenrook Member

    Messages:
    336
    Location:
    West Midlands UK
    I take it you aren't keeping inverts then? Otherwise you would be worried about the increased amount of disolved copper from your hot water tank or boiler.

    Temperature and increased copper are the reason I won't use this style of equipment, safer to do it manually and use boiled water from the kettle to bring the temperature up. A bit paranoid I know, but there is already extra copper in the water from your cold water tap from the copper pipes, without adding more from using water that has stood in a boiler or hot water tank.

    Of course, if no copper sensitive livestock this wouldn't be a concern. Oh and yeah, I know I'm been possibly excessively paranoid. :oops:

    Ade
     
  8. Aqua Essentials

    Aqua Essentials Sponsor Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,386
    Location:
    Devon
    I think you may be creating a rod for your own back there Ade :D

    I use hot water from very old water pipes and mix it with cold water for my CRS tank (and all tanks in fact)

    They're all alive and kicking (& breeding 8) )
     
  9. beeky

    beeky Member

    Messages:
    879
    Location:
    Chippenham, Wiltshire
    Using old pipes is probably better than new ones, similarly for hot water tanks. A nice build up of gunge and limescale coats the insides and prevents the worst of the leaching.

    I've always used rain water and a bit of tap for my water changes and heated up the water with a kettle. When I moved house I had to fill my tank up and get the fish in quickly so didn't have time to boil loads of water and didn't have any rain water either. The tank was filled with hot and cold water from the tap, a bit of dechlorinator (a large dash - didn't bother measuring!)and then in the fish went, including a few amano shrimps. I was a little apprehensive about it, but there were no casualties. I'm back to rain water now though :)
     
  10. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    4,428
    Location:
    Leamington Spa, UK.
    I've used water from the hot tap before with no problems. Mind, I have a comby boiler which heats the water straight away, so no tank for water to sit in. Its the same as using water from the cold tap really.
     
  11. JamesC

    JamesC Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    Location:
    Bexley, Kent
    Using water from newly installed copper piping and hot water tanks has killed entire shrimp populations in some peoples tanks that I know of. Once the pipes have aged for a few years they are normally a lot safer. If you have new copper piping then runing the water beforehand for a minute or two should be OK and probably best not to use the hot water if it comes from a new hot water tank.

    James
     
  12. nickyc

    nickyc Member

    Messages:
    208
    Location:
    Nottingham
    This has all been really useful! I've never dreamt of using hot water from the tap - in fact I always heat buckets with spare heaters! Seeing as so many others do it, I might try it for a while as I've no inverts. Is really helpful to hear how others solve this problem though - it's the only bit I dislike about this hobby as it plays havoc with my back :mad: I'm going to order the pump you've got there Chrissi as I reckon it'll work on mine. Thanks for all the help
     
  13. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

    Messages:
    4,126
    Location:
    Aston, Oxfordshire
    Will be doing something similar when I set up the 4ft, sod carrying all that water around!!

    Sam
     
  14. nickyc

    nickyc Member

    Messages:
    208
    Location:
    Nottingham
    Lol! We've got a 3ft and a 4ft - it's hard work!!
     
  15. niknaksky

    niknaksky Member

    Messages:
    153
    Location:
    shropshire
    When i setup my first marine reef i used tap water and water out of the hot tap as well.
    I had many inverts that never suffered from it but it might be worth testing for copper with a test kit to be sure.
     
  16. nickyc

    nickyc Member

    Messages:
    208
    Location:
    Nottingham
    I wouldn't do it on the marine tank - we use RO on that, but still handy to be able to pump it rather than lift buckets
     
  17. beeky

    beeky Member

    Messages:
    879
    Location:
    Chippenham, Wiltshire
    It's cheaper than going to the gym though! :lol:
     
  18. niknaksky

    niknaksky Member

    Messages:
    153
    Location:
    shropshire
    :lol: it sure is.

    I did switch to RO in the end though as the tapwater caused a bit algae outbreak.
    But just pointing out that hotwater can be used if needed but as said best to test for copper and other nasties as well
     

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