Journal Mission Bathtub and the Pollywog Party...

zozo

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H. aspersa is usually grey

I find loads of them in my garden and shed usually dark brown, but also find them in the nearby little forest in different colours, bicolour White light Brown striped.. I made a few pictures a few years back in the forest.. :)



All the way at the top you see a complete brown one, shiny too as if it's polished. In my garden, they are duller in colour... (Or am i mistaken and again looking at different sp. I'm a bad snailer.)


It was actually this scenery bellow, an old fallen prunus, that caught my eye and got me interest, but then when the dusk sat in all snails came out and I kept shooting a lot more pics till it was too dark.. :)

DSCN6784.jpg
 

dw1305

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nr Bath
Hi all,
I find loads of them in my garden and shed usually dark brown, but also find them in the nearby little forest in different colours, bicolour White light Brown striped..
The ones in the photo are <"Cepaea hortensis">, C. nemoralis is very similar, but has a dark lip to the shell. They are <"polymorphic">.

These are the snails that <"nearly all geneticists worked on"> before they could actually look at genes, because of their shell markings.

cheers Darrel
 

zozo

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Thank you Darrel!! :) Amazing isn't it? The Wisdom of the genes!? In general is likely the most underestimated and misunderstood property of life... We tend to think and reason with a brain only and it can't without... Maybe we never find out without finding a universal language able to truly communicate with other organisms than only ourselves... I guess the one reason, we talk too much. Speech development and make-believe obscure the obvious.
 

sparkyweasel

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30 Jun 2011
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I love those striped snails; I only used to see them on outings to the countryside, but now I've gtot them in both front and back gardens. I don't know if they migrated into town, like the foxes, or maybe my dad put some in the garden before I inherited the house, as he was a wildlife lover too. I've also got Garlic Snails, Oxychilus alliarius. Only the petit-gris are not welcome, they do enough damage to outweigh their appeal as wildlife. :)
 

PARAGUAY

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13 Nov 2013
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Lancashire
I often think environmental changes like closing of coal mines steel works cotton mills and the obviously controversial building on green belt modern industrial farming methods have impacted on wild life which is hard to quantify . We have cleaner air and a clean up of rivers but 97% of Wilddflower meadows gone , ponds disappeared, Whole swathes of Harrvest mouse habitat unsuitable. due to methods of farming.Hedgehog numbers estimated to be a quarter of what they were in the fifties. Sometimes we tend to look farther a field when a letter or two to our politicians might be a start
 
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