NPK what ratio

Discussion in 'Aquarium Fert Dosing' started by fishgeek, 7 Jan 2008.

  1. fishgeek

    fishgeek Member

    Messages:
    117
    Location:
    west sussex
    can anyone give me there thoughts on aquatic plants optimum N:p:K ratio... ignoring all other factors like source of phosphate food water etc

    thanks
     
  2. JamesC

    JamesC Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    Location:
    Bexley, Kent
    NO3:pO4:K in the ratio of 10:1:10 generally works fairly well. I like a 10:1:20 ratio. There is no real optimum ratio as different plants like different levels so a compromise is always made.

    N in NO3 = NO3 x 0.226
    P in PO4 = PO4 x 0.326

    James
     
  3. Garuf

    Garuf Member

    Messages:
    4,959
    Location:
    Leeds.
    Hello james, just a quick question, apologies for hi-jacking, when the trace gets precipitates in it is it time to throw it out? Also, is there anyway that I can add everything to one bottle for a all in one dose which I can double up when I know I'll be away from home for the night?
     
  4. JamesC

    JamesC Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    Location:
    Bexley, Kent
    Yes and yes.

    I've been using an all in one solution now for a while with great success. You may find some of the chemicals difficult to get hold of though. I'll post more in another thread.

    James
     
  5. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Expert/Global Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,937
    Location:
    Chicago, USA
    Hi,
    As James point's out there is no such thing as optimum ratio. EI dosing schemes are based on "infinite availability" of individual nutrients, not on ratios of nutrients. Each of the species and each specimen has it's optimum uptake based on current environmental conditions so that for example Alternanthera may use more phosphates than Anubias simply because it's production of fuel requires more. HC may uptake more Carbon than Java Moss simply because it's native environment may require it to a greater extent. There is no ratio or even uptake rate that can be unilaterally applied.

    Cheers,
     
  6. fishgeek

    fishgeek Member

    Messages:
    117
    Location:
    west sussex
    so realistically learning signs of deficency and understanding first principles of plant growth is what modern fertilisation comes down to?

    i was really asking because i know there are varying ratio's suggested in terrestrial plants fro say fruiting flowering, legumes etc
    maybe that s just subdividing plant needs into more specific niches and backs up the no one general ratio that is right

    thanks for the input
     

Share This Page

Facebook Page
Twitter Page
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice