Post Your Pics & Videos of the Great Outdoors

Tim Harrison

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
5 Nov 2011
Messages
7,642
Location
UK
Not sure what species it is but it's little clumps growing in crevices.
 

dw1305

Expert
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
10,192
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
Somewhere in Devon...
Batham looking east towards Thurlestone?
but it's little clumps growing in crevices.
The green algae is Ulva lactuca ("Sea Lettuce"), and the Brown seaweed (in the near ground) is Fucus spiralis ("Twisted Wrack").

I think the grooves in the rock (Old Red Sandstone) are "ripple marks" from when the rock was laid down ~400,000,000 years ago.

cheers Darrel
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
7,306
Location
Netherlands
Just wondering why everyone calling it Bluebells while it’s purple
I guess it's an old folk name from a region where they are dominantly blue. But you might also find them in white even but rather seldom in pink.. In hour language in it simply called the Wild Hyacint or the Forest Hyacint, but also mainly found and dissplayed in the color blue. I also have a plant named after it's color the Nymphaea Burgundy Princess, literaly dark red waterlily but hence it flowered twice this year and both times in White with a pink hue.

I also wondered what's burgundy about a white version and or why would it actualy grow white flowers at all if it's named and nursed and distributed for its particular color?.

I think not so long ago @dw1305 posted the clue in another thread that might be related, it's the Anthocyanin in the plants leaves and the recieved light intencity that determine color changes from red to blue to yellow and all intermediate colors in between. Purple is such an intermediate color mix from red and blue.. The color of anthocyanin pigment seems to be <Ph related>
Than very likely soil acidity or alkalinity will also have effect on the flowers color development and that a Bluebelss flower tends to color more purple on a slight acidic soil and more blue on nutral or maybe alkaline soils. :) But it still is a Bluebell..

My Burgundy red lily has developed white flowers and since some anthocyanines pigments degrade in higher pH the only clue i have why it turned white, is the pH in grows in is 8.5.
 
Last edited:

Oldguy

Member
Joined
27 Aug 2018
Messages
360
Location
Gloucestershire, UK
Than very likely soil acidity or alkalinity will also have effect on the flowers color development
Appears that way with hydrangeas. In our garden, plants sometimes change colour. We have white bluebells in some parts of the garden and blue in other parts and to the announce of the wife some of her white flowers in her white garden have gone pink. The latter are not self seeders but original plants. All makes for an interesting life.
 

Wolf6

Member
Joined
18 Dec 2014
Messages
42
Location
Netherlands
I'll add a few phone shots I made, nothing spectacular but I like em regardles. First a pic of sunrise in late januari in the woods where I bike through to get to work (if no corona WFH situation).
bosmist.jpg


Second pic is some rocks and trees I found pretty during a vacation in France. The spikey fallen tree just stood out, imagine it covered with mosses and ferns in the future, and then imagine the whole scene in a tank :)
bosinspiratiestenen.jpg


And last but not least, some fly agaric, also in the woods here.
vliegenzwam.jpg
 

Tim Harrison

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
5 Nov 2011
Messages
7,642
Location
UK
Lovely images, especially the top pic. That's one very nice commute to work :)
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
7,306
Location
Netherlands
which is rare here in NL.
Indeed... I remember working at a factory construction site with a specialized team flown in from the USA they were in Europe for the very first time. And they said, The Netherlands isn't a country, it's more like a relatively big city... It's nearly impossible to drive 2 miles without seeing some buildings... :eek:

We are so used to it we do not realize it any longer. I live down south and going to Amsterdam is quite a long trip in my perception, not something i would do every week. Also no need to we have everything we need multiple times over and for the most within walking distance.

For those USA fellows, it was peanuts, they went every Friday afternoon after work to Amsterdam to have fun and came back Sunday evening. Week in, week out. They actually did what they are used to when home. In the USA or Canada, it's common practice for a lot of folks to drive 4 hours to get to the first shop to buy a bottle of milk.

Something i never experienced in my life. Can't even imagine it...
 

Wolf6

Member
Joined
18 Dec 2014
Messages
42
Location
Netherlands
Indeed... I remember working at a factory construction site with a specialized team flown in from the USA they were in Europe for the very first time. And they said, The Netherlands isn't a country, it's more like a relatively big city... It's nearly impossible to drive 2 miles without seeing some buildings... :eek:

We are so used to it we do not realize it any longer. I live down south and going to Amsterdam is quite a long trip in my perception, not something i would do every week. Also no need to we have everything we need multiple times over and for the most within walking distance.

For those USA fellows, it was peanuts, they went every Friday afternoon after work to Amsterdam to have fun and came back Sunday evening. Week in, week out. They actually did what they are used to when home. In the USA or Canada, it's common practice for a lot of folks to drive 4 hours to get to the first shop to buy a bottle of milk.

Something i never experienced in my life. Can't even imagine it...
True, even here I'd have a hard time finding 2 miles without any buildings, there is always a hut, farm, mansion (or castle :) somewhere around :) But coming from Rotterdam myself, this is already amazing. Its not as bad as in China, when I was in Bejing and Shanghai I couldnt believe being in a train for an hour!!! and still not having left the city's outskirts. If the people there wanted to enjoy a forest, or something resembling that, it would take hours to get to.
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
7,306
Location
Netherlands
Relatively speaking, in terms of national forests in our country, i can not complain. I'm from what nowadays called Park City... In the Dutch Mountains so to speak. :cool: (Limbo).

Yet not posted any pictures, i rarely go out with a camera. But i will someday and show some when i go on a forest trip. I'm not sure if i'm able to at the moment, with the Stay Home Corona hype they closed down the best part for tourists. Even living only 15 minutes away from it, but outside the checkpoint borders, i'm still considered a tourist and not allowed to pass if i have no legit reason too. I try to find out if the restrictions are lifted. But that part of the country is fairly known by a lot of northern fellow countryman as Little Switzerland and go there for the holidays.

Anyway, it has quite some nice forests with some nice terrain contrasts in the valleys or on top of the hills. 💪
 

Wolf6

Member
Joined
18 Dec 2014
Messages
42
Location
Netherlands
Relatively speaking, in terms of national forests in our country, i can not complain. I'm from what nowadays called Park City... In the Dutch Mountains so to speak. :cool: (Limbo).

Yet not posted any pictures, i rarely go out with a camera. But i will someday and show some when i go on a forest trip. I'm not sure if i'm able to at the moment, with the Stay Home Corona hype they closed down the best part for tourists. Even living only 15 minutes away from it, but outside the checkpoint borders, i'm still considered a tourist and not allowed to pass if i have no legit reason too. I try to find out if the restrictions are lifted. But that part of the country is fairly known by a lot of northern fellow countryman as Little Switzerland and go there for the holidays.

Anyway, it has quite some nice forests with some nice terrain contrasts in the valleys or on top of the hills. 💪
Ah nice, looking forward to seeing them! We have a few hills here too (Utrechtse heuvelrug). Foto's dont do them justice, its a lot more then it looks (especially by bike!)
smolhill.jpg
 
Top