Problem with anubias

FishKeeper55

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One of the easier plant to care for and I still can't get this right
Not sure what's going on with them anubias, looks to effect the ones I have recently glued using aquatic glue to wood, some of them leaves yellowing but also having holes in them is well. I'm using Colombo plant grow fert at the moment, dosage is as recommend on bottle but I have devided that over 7 days so not sure if this is enough or the glue has done some damage, I have some more plants arriving this week to finish the tank but this has got me worried a bit.
Tank has only been setup about a week.

20200531-144717.jpg


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alto

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While this may be a glue reaction (what glue did you use, how much - especially if the rhizome has come into contact with the glue) it may also be a plant source issue

This is much less common in aquatic nursery “pot” grown Anubias
Plants that are grown elsewhere, then sold as “portions” or placed in pots just for resale, are more likely to react like this

While I might expect more “sensitive” plants to possibly react adversely to the changes the tank has gone through (including the release of substantial tannins from the mopani which occasionally impact plants), healthy Anubias is pretty resistant
 

FishKeeper55

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While this may be a glue reaction (what glue did you use, how much - especially if the rhizome has come into contact with the glue) it may also be a plant source issue

This is much less common in aquatic nursery “pot” grown Anubias
Plants that are grown elsewhere, then sold as “portions” or placed in pots just for resale, are more likely to react like this

While I might expect more “sensitive” plants to possibly react adversely to the changes the tank has gone through (including the release of substantial tannins from the mopani which occasionally impact plants), healthy Anubias is pretty resistant
Used the superfish plant glue, glue is touching one side of rhizome , can I somehow salvage this or this plant will die eventually, still could be down to the tannis or something else, but they looked very healthy until attached with glue.

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alto

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I’d remove the plant and inspect the rhizome - if there’s any rhizome “melt” (visible or soft to touch) - this needs to be cut away (very sharp thin razor works best) with a 5-10mm border of apparently healthy tissue
If there is only slight rhizome damage, you can be more conservative with the cuts

Also carefully remove leafs that are mostly yellow or damaged as they are usually a drain on plant resources

Have you cut the roots?
While these may not be “pretty” they can contribute to plant growth/health, so definitely don’t remove if leafs are damaged
 

FishKeeper55

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Thanks will have a look at it tomorrow after work and let you know, looks like the other anubias doing well even have a new little leaf opening up on one of them

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FishKeeper55

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Couple more pictures, you can see glue sits sort of on one side in middle, looks like effects the plant past the glue bit more then the front, rhizome feels hard to touch from front to back,I'm not expert so not sure if there is something else that might be the problem, also could the white fungus that grows on this wood and plants now is well could have something to do with this? regards removing leaves do you cut the leaves of by rhizome?

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20200601-161414.jpg
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
The leaf damage to the new leaves looks like drying damage. It can either be because the plant has actually become dry and not enough water got to the leaf edges (which would be my guess), or it can be <"fertiliser burn">, where a strong solution has pulled the water out of the leaf via osmosis.

You can also get it when a shade leaf (with a lot of chlorophyll in it) is exposed to intense light, in that case the extra energy intercepted causes the damage.

At the moment I would leave the damaged leaves on the plant, the older green leaves look fine, and the plant will shed the damaged leaves if they really aren't contributing.

cheers Darrel
 

EA James

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Hi all,
Hope you don't mind me jumping in here for some advice? I'm going to be adding a few Anubias into my tank later today, I'm guessing the roots need to be glued and not the rhizome?
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
I'm going to be adding a few Anubias into my tank later today, I'm guessing the roots need to be glued and not the rhizome?
Ideally I wouldn't glue Anubias. I want to try avoid any possible damage to the roots or rhizome.

Other people will trim the roots and then glue the rhizome (or roots) with cyanoacrylate super glue gel. I'd be more tempted to <"try gluing the roots"> rather than the rhizome.

Could you wedge, or tie, them on? I understand that is difficult with fixing them to rocks.

cheers Darrel
 
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FishKeeper55

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I did try to keep them moist as much as possible when out the water but it might not have been enough. Lesson learned if that's the case. I have another 2 larger anubias which looks fine.



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FishKeeper55

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Regards attaching them to rocks I found out that drilling 2 small holes in rock then using fine stainless steel wire works best, is less visible that way then having some sort of wire going around the rock. You can just see that wire in pic below.

20200524-123434.jpg


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EA James

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Could you wedge, or tie, them on?

I've already got quite a few Anubias sp. in the tank and they're wedged in between the rocks, the ones i'm adding today will be about a third of the way up on the branches of my wood.
I have some fishing line i can use to tie them on but i'm thinking that'll be quite tricky, like i'll need 3 hands! I would rather not use glue as i don't want to damage the plant
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
but i'm thinking that'll be quite tricky, like i'll need 3 hands! I would rather not use glue as i don't want to damage the plant
I just leave mine floating in the tanks now, but when I made more of an effort to fasten them down I used to use an elastic band, or a freezer tie, to get them positioned. Once they are tied, or glued, down you can cut the band off, or untwist the freezer tie.

cheers Darrel
 

Geoffrey Rea

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I'd be more tempted to <"try gluing the roots"> rather than the rhizome.

This ^^^

Same for Bucephalandra, Bolbitis etc... Also using a minimal amount of glue as possible on select roots and trying to get good surface contact between the rhizome and wood/rock you’re wanting it to attach to.

You can just use sandwich ties temporarily and remove once attached as mentioned above. I always forget to remove them :lol: so tend to reuse the black ones that you get holding wires together on electronic goods.

Also ADA green gain, Maxicrop Seaweed extract etc... put a dab under where you intend the rhizome to sit to get things moving along utilising plant hormones.
 

Conort2

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I use small cable ties, you can’t really see them if tucked in the middle of the plant/rhizome and after a while ones the roots have grabbed hold they can be cut off. Really easy to use too.

cheers

conor
 

FishKeeper55

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I wanted to ask you if white fungus can kill plants? looks like there is some information around on internet that white fungus has impact on live plants, how true is this?
 

Geoffrey Rea

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I wanted to ask you if white fungus can kill plants?

There will be many types of fungus so we would be talking very generally, but personally found that if fungus from wood at startup is left to cover some plants entirely, it will smother them to death if you don’t intervene.
 

FishKeeper55

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There will be many types of fungus so we would be talking very generally, but personally found that if fungus from wood at startup is left to cover some plants entirely, it will smother them to death if you don’t intervene.
So what would be the best corse of action against this? The only think I can think of is remove, wash put back, is spreading very quickly and growing lot thicker in places, I have removed some of it today, when you move your hand over the wood feels like slime.

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Geoffrey Rea

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On start up it’s only ever been an issue for the first three weeks personally. In that time I just get in there and siphon it out. Bucket and hose then refill the tank. Only really messes up slow growers; anubius, buce, mosses, liverworts.... if left to completely cover them. Would imagine it chokes the plant, which begins to break down, giving the fungus something to feed on.

If being really quick about it, just knocking it off leaves etc when draining the tank would be efficient.

Others will tell you it can do no harm and will disappear on its own.
 

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