spraybars and amazon frogbit?

Discussion in 'Plant Help' started by neelhound, 3 Dec 2009.

  1. neelhound

    neelhound Member

    Messages:
    169
    Im using spraybars at the surface so the water is moving about a lot, its not planted so when i tried using shepherds crook outflow etc i thin kthe oxygen went too low(its stil cycling btw)
    woudl amazon frogbit be bashed about everywhere? or will it just stay in the same place and allow the waves to pass under it by any chance? thanks
     
  2. Nick16

    Nick16 Member

    Messages:
    1,761
    Location:
    Surrey, UK
    often it will just get pushed into a corner and remained pinned there. i have had this problem with ricca, mine ended up getting mashed up and so spread out i was picking bits out of my tank for days.
     
  3. neelhound

    neelhound Member

    Messages:
    169
    i think it was with salvania that that happened, eventually it died i think, but i might try frogbit.
    I know about riccia, i dont like riccia it goes everywhere ive tried it stuck down in a planted tank but it loosened and floated up haha
     
  4. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

    Messages:
    8,267
    Location:
    nr Bath
    Hi all,
    I've found Amazon Frogbit (Limnobium) doesn't tend to do very well with lots of flow for the reasons mentioned. I've never had any problems with Salvinia or Pistia (Nile Cabbage), as they are very buoyant, and a bit more robust. Eichornia (Water Hyacinth) is also all right, but the roots tend to get knocked off and go everywhere.
    Have you tried Xmas moss (Vesicularia montagnei) rather than Riccia? It will anchor itself fairly securely to most surfaces.

    cheers Darrel
     
  5. neelhound

    neelhound Member

    Messages:
    169
    thanks,
    i have tried xmas moss in the planted tank and ive got a wall of it atm,
    im buying some plants online soon so i mightget just a little bit of frogbit and try it in a corner, its quite cheap. If it doesnt work out ill just move it into the planted tank maybe.
     
  6. MarkyG

    MarkyG Newly Registered

    Messages:
    16
    i found it to not be a problem. bought some from thegreenmachine, soon filled my 4foot just had to make sure i removed any damaged leaves which was about 10 a week which is not a lot considering tank size massive roots at least 12 to 16 inches hope this helps
     
  7. neelhound

    neelhound Member

    Messages:
    169
    did it get constantly pushed about?
    If i tied one of the long roots onto something in the tank, would it still grow?
    Ive also noticed Hygroryza aristata but id prefer a south american floating plant
     
  8. MarkyG

    MarkyG Newly Registered

    Messages:
    16
    yes and no, all it takes is one to catch on something even the spraybar, then they build little rafts with bits braking of and others catcing, but as you get more and more the movement slows right down i also found that a lot of the broken leaves were failed attempts at new plant-lets. If your after another south/central American floating plant how about Ludwigia helminthorrhiza.
     
  9. neelhound

    neelhound Member

    Messages:
    169
    thanks-
    hmm, i cant seem to find that for sale but will look harder.
    as for the frogbit, im not quite sure what you mean- if i tied them to a pieces of wood that stick fairly high up in the tank, would it die?
     
  10. MarkyG

    MarkyG Newly Registered

    Messages:
    16
    if you tie them what i found was that they would tare there roots, because of the water movement and the loose frogbit barrelling into them, if you want some Ludwigia helminthorrhiza pm your address and in the new year i will send you sum as i only had mine for 4 days myself. :thumbup:
     
  11. neelhound

    neelhound Member

    Messages:
    169
    thanks, but do you think i shoudl try Hydrocotyle leucocephala?
     

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