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Switching a light

Aqua360

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15 Feb 2016
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paisley
Hi all, hope everyone's enjoying the warm weather!

I'm considering upgrading my led on my nano from an aqua one 30 clip on led, to the Chihiros c2.

I'm currently running the aqua one led for 6hrs (simple on/off timer), but the Chihiros allows you to ramp up, down, and adjust brightness incrementally.

I don't have a PAR metre unfortunately, just wondering if anyone had suggestions for making the switch and finding the ideal light intensity without encouraging algae?

My assumption is to start low, say 20% or equivalent, and slowly ramp this up, I'm guessing until algae starts to appear, then back it down a little? Over the course of days and weeks?

I inject co2, but at a very slow rate of 1 bubble per 5 seconds, as I'm trying to keep things as stable as possible.
 

MichaelJ

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9 Feb 2021
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Minnesota, USA
Hi all, hope everyone's enjoying the warm weather!

I'm considering upgrading my led on my nano from an aqua one 30 clip on led, to the Chihiros c2.
The Chihiros c2 looks nice.. Having the ability to adjust the intensity is essential and the sunrise/sunset ramping is very nice as well.

I'm currently running the aqua one led for 6hrs (simple on/off timer), but the Chihiros allows you to ramp up, down, and adjust brightness incrementally.

I don't have a PAR metre unfortunately, just wondering if anyone had suggestions for making the switch and finding the ideal light intensity without encouraging algae?
If you currently do not have an algae issue, you can probably just eyeball the intensity of the Chihiros until it matches that of your current Aqua One 30... .Looks like the output from the Chihiros is about double that of the Aqua One 30 so it will have to go down quite a bit as a starting point... that should be fairly easy when switching the lights around (you may have to switch back and forth a bit to judge the intensity in the tank). I would definitely error on the safe side of having the new light at a perceptually slightly lower intensity. On a side note: It always surprises me that people accept such short photoperiods, such as 6 hours - thats like Anchorage, Alaska in the winter... not a very natural day length for tropical plants and livestock ... not to mention your ability to enjoy your tank... if I have to compromise it will always be in favor of a longer photoperiod :)

Cheers,
Michael
 
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Aqua360

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The Chihiros c2 looks nice.. Having the ability to adjust the intensity is essential and the sunrise/sunset ramping is very nice as well.


If you currently do not have an algae issue, you can probably just eyeball the intensity of the Chihiros until it matches that of your current Aqua One 30... .Looks like the output from the Chihiros is about double that of the Aqua One 30 so it will have to go down quite a bit as a starting point... that should be fairly easy when switching the lights around (you may have to switch back and forth a bit to judge the intensity in the tank). I would definitely error on the safe side of having the new light at a perceptually slightly lower intensity. On a side note: It always surprises me that people accept such short photoperiods, such as 6 hours - thats like Anchorage, Alaska in the winter... not a very natural day length for tropical plants and livestock ... not to mention your ability to enjoy your tank... if I have to compromise it will always be in favor of a longer photoperiod :)

Cheers,
Michael
Yeah I know what you mean, good thing about something like the Chihiros is you can then have the option to extend the photoperiod at a lower intensity, definite bonus!
 

Wolf6

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18 Dec 2014
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Better to err on the cautious side, so start off at 70% or so and increase slowly. I replaced my scapers light with a ONF nano+ a while back and just gambled that 80% would be a good starting point, which when going by eye looks a lot dimmer. Turned out to be spot on so havent touched it since.
 

Aqua360

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15 Feb 2016
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Location
paisley
Better to err on the cautious side, so start off at 70% or so and increase slowly. I replaced my scapers light with a ONF nano+ a while back and just gambled that 80% would be a good starting point, which when going by eye looks a lot dimmer. Turned out to be spot on so havent touched it since.
I wish par meters were affordable lol
 

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