Terrestial plant fertilizer for planted aquarium use?

Discussion in 'Aquarium Fert Dosing' started by kajaksurfa, 21 Nov 2009.

  1. kajaksurfa

    kajaksurfa Newly Registered

    Joined:
    18 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Uddevalla, Sweden
    Hello,

    My plantshop (terrestial plants) has a liquid fertlizer (Substral Iron+)
    250 ml / 35 SEK= 3,5 £
    containing per 100ml:

    N: 7.1g
    P: 1.5 g
    K: 5.9 g
    Mg: 0,2 g
    Fe: 35 mg
    Mn: 10mg
    B: 10mg
    Cu: 5mgr
    Zn: 2mg
    Mo: 1mg

    Could this be diluted with destilled water and be used as fertilizer for aquarium plants?
    Is there a risk that the included elements is toxic depending how they are bound to each other chemically?
    (more even so to the fish I presume)
    What are the pro's and Con's with using terrestial plant fertilizers in aquaria? Anyone tested?
    What are your experiences?

    Best Regards Leif
     
  2. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Expert/Global Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    11 Jul 2007
    Messages:
    8,953
    Location:
    Chicago, USA
    Hi,
    Yes, you are absolutely correct. The toxicity will depend on how the elements are bound. You have to be careful with terrestrial products because the source of the N is often an ammonia salt. Try to find out exactly what the actual salts in the product are, not just what their equivalent elemental percentages. you need to know that before any analysis can be performed on dilution.

    Cheers,
     
  3. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

    Joined:
    7 Apr 2008
    Messages:
    8,371
    Location:
    nr Bath
    Hi all,
    Most horticultural liquid fertilisers will use Ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) as the nitrogen source. This is because you get "more bang for your buck", as it contains 33.5% N., and is very soluble. The other advantage is that it it isn't a very "salty" salt and has a proportionally lower effect on the conductivity of hydroponic solutions than potassium nitrate would (hydroponic nutrient solutions are a lot more concentrated than tank water and typically have conductivity levels of 2- 7 milli-siemens ).
    cheers Darrel
     

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