Types of FE, chelated? edta? dpta?

dcurzon

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So for my first mix of micros, I used CSM+B from AquaPlantsCare

However, my water report states that I have very hard water 320mg/l

Screenshot 2020-07-20 at 22.24.04.png


I used a tsp (approx 5g) to 500ml of the csm+b, but should I add a different Fe powder to this next time?? Its quite confusing, so keep it simple :)
 

Witcher

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If you're ok with slightly pinkish tone of your water (of course it depends how much Fe will you add), EDDHA is stable between 4-9pH and there is no precipitation in very hard water - I've tested it with the water straight out of my tap plus KH2PO4 in the glass left for week or so (my tap water is similar to yours in terms of hardness).
 

dcurzon

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If you're ok with slightly pinkish tone of your water (of course it depends how much Fe will you add), EDDHA is stable between 4-9pH and there is no precipitation in very hard water - I've tested it with the water straight out of my tap plus KH2PO4 in the glass left for week or so (my tap water is similar to yours in terms of hardness).

I don't mind a slight tint...
Can I just throw it in with the csm+b ? APC seem to sell 8% DTPA, any recommended supplier for eddha?

Thanks

@jaypeecee gave it a read, too complex for me though :O
 

ceg4048

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I don't mind a slight tint...
Can I just throw it in with the csm+b ? APC seem to sell 8% DTPA, any recommended supplier for eddha?

Thanks

@jaypeecee gave it a read, too complex for me though :O
Hello,
This is one of those situations where we make life more complicated for ourselves with very little to show for it.

Iron is a micronutrient, which means the plant only needs microscopic amounts of iron. About one hour after you have dosed iron, the plant has already taken up it's fill. Of course it's easy to pummel the plant with more iron than it needs without any ill effects, but why bother? Why spend more money and effort for specialized chelation when it is already overkill with the less efficient chelated methods? I really doubt you will see any benefit.

A lot of this hand wringing over [insert your favorite chelator here] arises because for generations, people have misdiagnosed the basic deficiency of plants. They see yellowing of leaves and immediately assume it's due to lack of iron. There are even folks who spend their hard earned cash on [gasp] Iron Test Kits. In 99% of these cases, their tap water already had sufficient iron and the real deficiency is Nitrogen, but since everyone becomes hysterical at the mere thought of adding Nitrate, then one myth feeds another to create pandemonium.

My advice is to use the cheapest and/or the most convenient source of iron and simply carry on. If iron is present in your basic micronutrient mix, then just use that without worry.

Cheers,
 

dcurzon

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Joined
4 Jul 2020
Messages
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Location
Essex
Hello,
This is one of those situations where we make life more complicated for ourselves with very little to show for it.

Iron is a micronutrient, which means the plant only needs microscopic amounts of iron. About one hour after you have dose iron, the plant has already taken up it's fill. Of course it's easy to pummel the plant with more iron than it needs without any ill effects, but why bother? Why spend more money and effort for specialized chelation when it is already overkill with the less efficient chelated methods? I really doubt you will see any benefit.

A lot of this hand wringing over [insert your favorite chelator here] arises because for generations, people have misdiagnosed the basic deficiency of plants. They see yellowing of leaves and immediately assume it's due to lack of iron. There are even folks who spend their hard earned cash on [gasp] Iron Test Kits. In 99% of these cases, their tap water already had sufficient iron and the real deficiency is Nitrogen, but since everyone becomes hysterical at the mere thought of adding Nitrate, then one myth feeds another to create pandemonium.

My advise is to use the cheapest and/or the most convenient source of iron and simply carry on. If iron is present in your basic micronutrient mix, then just use that without worry.

Cheers,
Thanks, that's a pretty good summation :D
 

Alex Papp

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26 Mar 2018
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London
Hello,
This is one of those situations where we make life more complicated for ourselves with very little to show for it.

Iron is a micronutrient, which means the plant only needs microscopic amounts of iron. About one hour after you have dosed iron, the plant has already taken up it's fill. Of course it's easy to pummel the plant with more iron than it needs without any ill effects, but why bother? Why spend more money and effort for specialized chelation when it is already overkill with the less efficient chelated methods? I really doubt you will see any benefit.

A lot of this hand wringing over [insert your favorite chelator here] arises because for generations, people have misdiagnosed the basic deficiency of plants. They see yellowing of leaves and immediately assume it's due to lack of iron. There are even folks who spend their hard earned cash on [gasp] Iron Test Kits. In 99% of these cases, their tap water already had sufficient iron and the real deficiency is Nitrogen, but since everyone becomes hysterical at the mere thought of adding Nitrate, then one myth feeds another to create pandemonium.

My advice is to use the cheapest and/or the most convenient source of iron and simply carry on. If iron is present in your basic micronutrient mix, then just use that without worry.

Cheers,
This is the best thing I've seen about ferts dosing on ukaps! All you need is a tiny amount once every 1/2 weeks. Like you say its a Micronutrient. I use Seachems (water soluble) iron gluconate
 

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