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What makes fish colours realy pop??

toadass

Member
Joined
26 Aug 2010
Messages
185
Hi guys
When visiting different stores and looking at there Cardinal Tetra, some stores seem to make there colours stand out alot more than others.
Is this down to what lighting is used? As some people say it's the health of the fish that make the colour stand out!
I'd like to buy some cardinals as they look superb when grouped together and the colours are realy showing.
I have x2 daylight bulbs from Lampspecs, if i replace the front bulb would this make the colours show?
If so what bulb would be best to use?
Lampspecs do a blue tube Coloured T5 24W, or would a Reef bulb be the best option, white blue, moonlight ect??

Many Thanks
 

dw1305

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7 Apr 2008
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nr Bath
Hi all,
also live foods help too.. banana worm, micro worm etc
Live food is definitely the one for me, I feed some Grindal/Banana worms every day, but particularly crustaceans like Cyclops and Daphnia enhance colour.

cheers Darrel
 

Manrock

Member
Joined
15 Dec 2007
Messages
225
Anyone know a good source/shop for live daphina to grow on and breed? Is it better to buy a culture or pond dip?

Cheers
 

Iain Sutherland

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Cambridge
if you just throw any live daphnia you can get into a dustbin with straw in the bottom it will just keep going all year round. Its too easy. As a bonus through spring/summer months you will get mosquito larvae, blood worm and all sorts of other live critters your fish will love!
 

Willard

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22 Oct 2011
Messages
46
Location
Merseyside
Hi Iain, re your bin suggestion, I was considering something like this, but what kind of minimum tempertures can daphnia tolerate?
 

Willard

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22 Oct 2011
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46
Location
Merseyside
Thanks Iain, surprised to hear they can survive such low temperatures. Im going to start my own little breeding program.
 

NatureBoy

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Joined
27 Aug 2008
Messages
374
if you just throw any live daphnia you can get into a dustbin with straw in the bottom it will just keep going all year round. Its too easy. As a bonus through spring/summer months you will get mosquito larvae, blood worm and all sorts of other live critters your fish will love!

I'm gonna do this with my water butt I reckon...do you have a lid on your bin or just leave it? is rainwater sufficient or do they need a bit of TDS?

cheers
 

kassiel

Seedling
Joined
28 Feb 2013
Messages
6
Location
Bury
Do you have to feed them anything? Or is it literally just leave them to it?
 

Ed Seeley

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3 Jul 2007
Messages
3,258
Location
Nottingham
The right lighting and good food as others have said. I've fed red granular crumb for years and it really enhances colours imo and is cheap too.
 

dw1305

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nr Bath
Hi all,
I'm gonna do this with my water butt I reckon...do you have a lid on your bin or just leave it? is rainwater sufficient or do they need a bit of TDS?
Same as Ed and Ian says all you do is get a container of water and put a few grass cuttings in, you want it in a light place, but not 100% sun, to encourage "green water" algae. The grass releases nutrient from the cut ends, and as it decay it produces algae and rotifers etc that the Daphnia etc. eat.

I don't add any TDS, but it is all limestone around me and our rain-water has about 100microS conductivity. If I was just culturing live food (I use the water for water changes) I'd add some "Oyster Shell" chick grit to raise dGH/dKH.

In the summer the same containers will produce mosquito larvae, these breathe air, so they do well even in polluted, de-oxygenated water (but I would be wary of getting too polluted), where you can get huge numbers build up. Blood-worms (non-biting midge larvae), are slightly less pollution tolerant, but can survive in polluted water because of the haemoglobin they contain. Daphnia actually need quite good water quality, and if the water becomes too polluted they will die (this is why you tend to get "boom & bust" in tank cultures).

Again as Ian says you can harvest Daphnia and Blood-worms in the winter, even though the productivity drops off.

Ed's method works really well, but I'd still add some dried grass for the reason Ian suggests. There is a really useful article about using hay as a long term food source for Daphnia on the caudata.org forum < Results from experimentation with Daphnia Cultures- Alternate Feeding - Caudata.org Newt and Salamander Forum>.

This is something I've noticed myself from my Blood-worm/Mosquito Larvae buckets, where I add grass cuttings. In these buckets the Daphnia remain productive for long time periods, without the problems of "boom and bust" cultures.

The only other thing is that the female mosquito needs somewhere to perch when she lays her egg raft. A wine cork works really well.

cheers Darrel
 

NatureBoy

Member
Joined
27 Aug 2008
Messages
374
Cheers Darrel

I'll definitely give this a go, though I'll keep the fact I'm rearing a horde of bloodsuckers next to the bedroom window quiet...:shh:

What's best for the starter culture - pond dip, lfs or biology grade? I've stopped buying live food from fish shop for fear of introducing intestinal nasties, should I be cautious with my starting point or not too fussed?

many thanks
 

dw1305

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Pond dip. Mosquito and Chironomid midges ("blood-worm") fly in, it is worth having Asellus and snails as well as Daphnia in the culture.
I've stopped buying live food from fish shop for fear of introducing intestinal nasties, should I be cautious with my starting point or not too fussed?
Not too fussed, it should be fine, it is fish free zone, so even if fish parasites are introduced they won't persist.

cheers Darrel
 

NatureBoy

Member
Joined
27 Aug 2008
Messages
374
Pond dip. Mosquito and Chironomid midges ("blood-worm") fly in, it is worth having Asellus and snails as well as Daphnia in the culture.

Not too fussed, it should be fine, it is fish free zone, so even if fish parasites are introduced they won't persist.

cheers Darrel
Many thanks

I tried out a few chopped up earthworms the other day and everything went crazy for them, even the ember tetras were getting stuck in, looking forward to a varied free supply of live food

thanks for the links
 
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