8l nano. little project

samc

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28 Oct 2008
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1,381
:wave:

this is my latest project :D i was going to put a picture up earlier but the camera was playing up.

this tank was saved as it was about to be thrown in the skip by a friend. it has cost me about £10 to set up which was mainly the light :D
the rocks were from the garden. the sand was also going to be thrown away. the filter i have had for a while kicking about, so why not set it up.

the specs:
tank 12x8x8
filteration HOB
heating none
light 9w

plants are currently tiawan moss and staurogyne sp. and soon rotala rotundifolia will be added in the back right corner.
there is plenty of staurogyne sp. behind the rocks which will start to show soon :thumbup:
this is not ment to be anything special :lol: but thought i would show it anyway.

can anyone guess the fish?



just to show where the staurgyne is and the gap for the rotala


 

rawr

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14 Apr 2009
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Enfield
Some kind of microrasbora...? :rolleyes: :p

I really like it! Nice simple tank, and that rock structure is ace.
 

Garuf

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30 Oct 2007
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That's bloody lovely that, I tried using round rocks in my nano but I couldn't get mine anywhere this nice.
I'd use hm rather than Rotalla, it's smaller and will give better sense of scale. Well done!
 
Joined
14 May 2009
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316
Love the cobble stones, they give a very natural appearnce.
I would have guessed microrasbora as well, just shows how strong the family resemblance is among Cyprinids.
Glad to see you have good surface disturbance, as Roach are so oxygen hungry.

Cheers
James
 

dsandson

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25 Jun 2008
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Belfast, NI
Hi Sam

Glad to see the Staurogyne is going well, and the tank looks amazing. I'd agree with Garuf about the Rotala, HM would be much better. Or maybe even something grassy... maybe E Tennelus?

Dave
 

George Farmer

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Also consider a handful of pea gravel sprinkled around the main stone bases, to add further interest and natural appearance.
 

George Farmer

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Go for it.

Pea gravel presents a similar colour, texture and shape, but it's smaller, so makes for a great transition between the sand and larger pebbles.

The more sizes you mix, the smoother the transition. Experiment to see what works best for you.

Smooth transitions can work very well, but also dramatic contrasts can work too...

Have fun!
 

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