Need help with new tank

alto

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I’d break up the plants into more (smaller) clumps (? that always sounds a bit rude :oops: )
 

DEL 707

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Regulator turned up and I picked up a CO2 canister as well.

Started filling up the tank more and the bogwood took off again! Weighted it down with another stone but still can't fill up the tank completely.
But did give me an excuse to replant some of the grass.
 

DEL 707

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Bloody woods still giving me grief, it's moved so much the front soil looks like a bunch of sand dunes.
I think we I need a water changed next week, I'll redo the tank again.

On the plus side, I got enough water in to get the heater and CO2 going.

There's a bubble counter on the regulator, I assume it's safe to just add water to it?
 

Andrew Butler

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Without meaning to sound rude the best advice I can give you is take a step back and try not to be in such a rush, I think it's where a lot of people go wrong.
If you can just take that step back, be patient and hold on a little while then you could get things moving along quicker, easier and probably thank yourself.

One option if you want the wood sinking and to get things going yesterday would be to empty things out and as wood can take a very long time to sink could be to get a slate flooring tile, screw the wood to the slate from the underneath using an appropriate stainless steel screw then trim the slate so it's footprint is not as large. This would also give you an opportunity to trim the wood if you feel it's oversized, angle it as you like and move things along quicker.

I'm not saying this is the thing to do but just one option.
 

Onoma1

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I found James Wong's site invaluable when setting up my first aquarium. This section in his site may be helpful for you in relation to C02: https://www.advancedplantedtank.com/choosing-co2-why.html

You could follow Andrew's advice on the wood - this works for a lot of people and he used it to great effect in is Lonely Tree / Cloudy Sky scape with a difficult piece of wood/position. Alternatively, you could glue it to the base (see the Filipe Oliveira's scape in Aquarium Gardens where he demonstrates this technique). My prefered approach would be just keep a stone on it for a few weeks until it is soaked, smooth out the 'sand dunes' during your next water change and let your plants settle in.


 

DEL 707

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Yeah, I royally messed up with the bogwood.

I'm hoping it settles by Tuesday when I do a water change so that I can sort out the gravel and replant stuff. If not I'll have to just keep waiting.

Planning to do a 50% water change weekly. That about right.?
Currently doing 6 hours of CO2 and lighting, CO2 comes on and turns off 1 hours before the lights.
 

alto

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With that amount to wood, I’d strongly suggest more frequent water changes

50-70% as often as you can do them :)

Refill with cooler water (more dissolved gases including oxygen and often CO2)

If you don’t notice the wood becomes at least somewhat less “floaty” I’d intervene
(try boiling (the heat speeds up the water logging process) if you remove it from the tank - I’d also give is good scrub post-boil to check for loose wood fibres)

Looking back at the type of wood, I think boiling should suffice (rather than needing to attach stone)
 
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DEL 707

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I boiled the wood again on Tuesday and replanted everything.
Unfortunately woods still floating, so pinning it down with rocks and the heater.

2lNJqf3.jpg


CO2's been going for around 2 hours at this point, should I be aiming for a higher green. I know nothings in the tank but I've always worried about CO2, the last time I had a planted tank (nearly 10 years ago), the fish were gasping whenever it was green.

UEv0k8w.jpg


Was thinking of looking into some inverts, but looks like I'm still early on in the cycle.

luUPeuC.jpg


Should I keep going with the 50% weekly water changes and my 6 hour C02/lighting schedule?
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
No, filters only been working for a few days, I'm assuming it's some dead plant matter...or someones been peeing in my RO water!
Strange, that is a lot of ammonia. No real idea of why you have so much (unless some-one is peeing in your RO).

cheers Darrel
 

DEL 707

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Using this seachem equilibrium and RO water, it says use 1 teaspoon for 3dgh water hardness. Which I've done so far, should I be aiming for higher?
Made a bit of a cockup, re-read the instructions today, it's meant to be a tablespoon, not a teaspoon.

PH seems really low, only 6.0, is that because I've been dosing incorrectly, or do I need a buffer?
 

alto

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Made a bit of a cockup, re-read the instructions today, it's meant to be a tablespoon, not a teaspoon.

PH seems really low, only 6.0, is that because I've been dosing incorrectly, or do I need a buffer?
I’d not worry about pH, just keep up with frequent water changes and let everything establish
Most recommend daily or alternate day water changes at this stage
If the wood is releasing loads of organics into the water column, I’d do daily water changes if possible
(and wouldn’t worry about any additives except dechlorinator)

Compare what you’re seeing with your test kit vs local water parameters (acc water supplier etc)
 

ian_m

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No, filters only been working for a few days, I'm assuming it's some dead plant matter...or someones been peeing in my RO water!
Or could be from your RO water. You must always always dechlorinate\de-ammonia\test your RO water as RO units are not 100% guaranteed to remove chlorine/chloramine.

Your excessive ammonia levels could be coming from your RO water.

Chlorine\ammonia in RO water can be removed by either something like Prime, or aerating/standing for 24hours before use. A test kit will give an accurate answer (free chlorine test kit and/or ammonia test kit) as there will be only one ion present, unlike fish tank water and test kits.

The chlorine in RO water comes from not using or using an exhausted RO or finally running flow too fast with a carbon/chlorguard pre-filter. The pre-filter fails to remove the chlorine, which then damages the RO membrane and passes through into the RO water. So you need a top notch, preferable Chlorguard based RO pre-filter, running sufficiently slow to guarantee chlorine removal.

The ammonia in RO water, is similar due to poor pre-filter, and presence of chloramine in the incoming water. If the pre-filter is poor (or incorrect type) the chloramine is broken down by the pre-filter to chlorine and ammonia, the chlorine is absorbed, but ammonia needs longer to be absorbed, but if left in water, passes through the RO membrane into the RO water.

The marine big boys with expensive fish, either ensure their pre-filters are top notch, have lots of pre-filters, test the RO water or just add Prime before use.
 

DEL 707

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Unfortunately I've not had time to do any water changes during the week. But I went and go some more RO and did a 50% change today.

These were my test results before the change.

7GtFy4y.jpg


So definately progressing along the nitrogen cycle.

I checked my RO water and got 0 with my ammonia test, but I am dosing with Prime now as a precaution.
 

david boden

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DEL--I can't advise you anywhere near as well as the other guys regarding plants etc.

However, I do have 5 Aquanano tanks up and running , so I'm very familiar with their good and not so good points.
The first thing I feel I need to mention is that the filled tank is going to weigh around 100 pounds, and it's asking a lot of your drawer top to sustain that weight without dipping in the middle.

Secondly, those four little feet underneath the tank really love to dig into wooden things when the weight pushes down, therefore you may benefit from getting a thick piece of perspex cut to the width of your furniture top to spread the weight, and protect the furniture top.---of course that's entirely up to you.

Lastly, I understand why you've been told not to bother with noodles, and use the sponges supplied, but I can tell you that the sponges really restrict the flow through the various filter chambers, and you'll eventually get a water level drop in the final powerhead chamber that's gonna cause you trouble.

My solution is to use a wad of floss, or sponge behind the inlet slots, and then use a good many loose noodles in the other chambers to allow free flow of the water through the system. Even then, you may need to change the floss regularly, or keep the sponge clear.

I'm only trying to help you on this specific tank, , and certainly don't seek to override any other poster, or indeed your own wishes.
 

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