Salt water to fresh water - Cleaning out an Eheim Pro3 filter

Teeny

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Hi,
I recently bought a second hand 180L tank that came with an Eheim pro 3. The previous owner had a salt water tank, but I want to use it for freshwater aquatic frogs. I've been advised to boil all the filter parts to dissolve the salt traces... but I'm not sure about submerging the top section (where most of the salt is) - is there exposed wiring inside? Will it be ok to soak it?
Thanks,
Christina
 

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alto

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I doubt Eheim would support boiling :eek:
Just run filter in soft water or mildly acidic water (1 part pickling vinegar to 4 parts water), allow a few days for stubborn deposits - why would the salt traces be an issue anyway :confused:
 

Teeny

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Salt is toxic to the frogs - you can only use a small amount to treat diseases. So I'd like to give it a thorough clean so I know what's going in the tank.
I'll give it a go with the diluted vinegar. Thanks!
 

alto

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This frog in an incredibly resilient invasive species!



Xenopus laevis is a primarily aquatic, highly adaptable frog that can inhabit almost any body of water, natural or man-made, and tolerates sewage and relatively saline (up to 14%; or 40% seawater) waters (Passmore and Carruthers, 1995; Tinsley et al., 1996; Lafferty and Page, 1997; Channing, 2001; Elliott et al., 2009; Dodd, 2013). It can survive fairly cold, temperate climates and can easily disperse overland in order to exploit new habitats, particularly newly created man-made habitats (McCoid and Fritts, 1993; Tinsley et al., 1996; Channing, 2001; Lobos and Garín, 2002; Crayon, 2005; Lobos and Jaksic, 2005; Faraone et al., 2008; Measey et al., 2012; Dodd, 2013).

African Clawed Frogs can survive droughts by burrowing into the substrate (Tinsley et al., 1996; Channing, 2001; Dodd, 2013). Their unique sliding pelvis apparatus allows them to avoid predators by diving backwards from the water surface (Videler and Jorna, 1985). Moreover, powerful toxins in the skin can deter some predators (McCoid and Fritts, 1993; Tinsley et al., 1996; Channing, 2001).

These carnivores mostly consume aquatic invertebrates, but also include small vertebrates, including other X. laevis, in their diet (McCoid and Fritts, 1980, 1993; Tinsley et al., 1996; Lafferty and Page, 1997; Measey, 1998a; Channing, 2001; Crayon, 2005; Lobos and Jaksic, 2005; Dodd, 2013). Additionally, it is capable of capturing terrestrial prey (Measey, 1998b).

Xenopus laevis can survive starvation conditions for at least 12 months and can rapidly regain lost weight when food is once again available (Tinsley et al., 1996).

The hardy adults live up to 12 years, with a record of over 30 years (McCoid and Fritts, 1989; Tinsley and McCoid, 1996; Channing, 2001; Tinsley et al., 2012).
 

mort

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You will also have a massive dilution factor where any traces of salt are pretty negligible when considering the full volume of the tank. I'd follow the advice above.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
I agree with the others, you can just soak it to get rid of any NaCl residue. All sodium compounds are soluble, so soaking will remove them.

Sea water contains quite a lot of carbonates (that is why it is alkaline and you get coral reefs etc.), and a weak acid should remove those. You can even use hydrochloric acid (HCl) if they are very persistent deposits. Have a look at <"What is the precipitate...">, it is really useful.

cheers Darrel
 

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