• You are viewing the forum as a Guest, please login (you can use your Facebook, Twitter, Google or Microsoft account to login) or register using this link: Log in or Sign Up
  • You can now follow UKAPS on Instagram.

Sodium thiosulfate

_Maq_

Member
Joined
23 Jun 2022
Messages
633
Location
Czech Republic

ian_m

Global Moderator
UKAPS Team
Joined
25 Jan 2012
Messages
5,371
Location
Eastleigh
Meaning in the regular tank filter? Then I'd say not, it would take time to remove the chlorine and exposing livestock to chlorine for any length of time isn't advisable.
I believe people use actived carbon filters to filter the water prior to putting it in the tank and that effectively removes any chlorine but to the best of my knowledge it doesn't remove chloramine.
A "dechlor" filter (activated carbon) will remove both chlorine and chloramine. However the flow rate has to be sufficiently slow to allow full absorption, as the chloramine is broken down to chlorine and ammonia and have to be absorbed by the filter. Many people use these type filters before their RO systems to protect the RO membrane, as they are easily destroyed by chlorine and they won't remove ammonia.
Lots of people use them to remove chlorine for fish water and drinking water use. You must make sure the filter is never exhausted, as after so many litres have flowed, as it will stop working.
 

_Maq_

Member
Joined
23 Jun 2022
Messages
633
Location
Czech Republic
However the flow rate has to be sufficiently slow to allow full absorption, as the chloramine is broken down to chlorine and ammonia and have to be absorbed by the filter.
Yes, the flow speed seems to be the problem.
However, I think there's an imprecision in your post: Chloramine is broken down to chloride and ammonia, that's correct, but chlorine is then reduced to chloride (harmless). In the latter, AC works as a catalyst. In this, I believe AC exhaustion is only of minor importance.
 

ian_m

Global Moderator
UKAPS Team
Joined
25 Jan 2012
Messages
5,371
Location
Eastleigh
Yes, the flow speed seems to be the problem.
However, I think there's an imprecision in your post: Chloramine is broken down to chloride and ammonia, that's correct, but chlorine is then reduced to chloride (harmless). In the latter, AC works as a catalyst. In this, I believe AC exhaustion is only of minor importance.
Sorry, you are correct, chloride comes out, which in a RO system is removed by the RO membrane.

Exhaustion is a problem, as it will allow chlorine and chloramine through when exhausted. When I had an evening tour of a local fish shop (closed down in pandemic and never recovered) they had a flow meter after the carbon filter (and before RO membrane) to work out when to change the carbon filter. (2000 gallons ?). All the RO went to storage containers and was tested for free chlorine and ammonia before being used in their tanks or sold to customers. Yes they has had positives for chlorine on RO output water as they had a failed carbon filter, possibly incorrect fitting or damaged during assembly. It wrecked the RO membrane and would have killed their fish and customers fish if it had been used.
 

jaypeecee

Member
Joined
21 Jan 2015
Messages
2,959
Location
Bracknell
A "dechlor" filter (activated carbon) will remove both chlorine and chloramine.
Hi,

It's very rare that I need to remove chlorine and/or chloramine but it's good to know that it can be done by filtration.

I see that the Dechlor filter can be obtained from the company, Feedwater. A couple of days ago, I shortlisted this company for lab water tests. What is your experience of the services and products supplied by this company, if you don't mind my asking?

JPC
 

ian_m

Global Moderator
UKAPS Team
Joined
25 Jan 2012
Messages
5,371
Location
Eastleigh
A couple of days ago, I shortlisted this company for lab water tests. What is your experience of the services and products supplied by this company, if you don't mind my asking?
No experience. Just know that people use "dechlor" cartridges to remove chlorine and chloramine. I think you can actually used "plain olde activated carbon" to remove chlorine and chloramine, but flow rate has to be quite slow, to allow chloramine to be broken down and/or be absorbed successfully. The "dechlor" carbon cartridges have a catalyst (platinum ?) in them that greatly speeds up the process so you can get a higher flow rate.
 

jaypeecee

Member
Joined
21 Jan 2015
Messages
2,959
Location
Bracknell
The "dechlor" carbon cartridges have a catalyst (platinum ?) in them that greatly speeds up the process so you can get a higher flow rate.
Hi @ian_m

Thanks for your reply.

If the catalyst uses platinum, the cartridges are likely to be very expensive.

JPC
 

_Maq_

Member
Joined
23 Jun 2022
Messages
633
Location
Czech Republic
If the catalyst uses platinum, the cartridges are likely to be very expensive.
Not necessarily. It's often the technology that makes things pricey more than microscopic amounts of precious materials.
 

jaypeecee

Member
Joined
21 Jan 2015
Messages
2,959
Location
Bracknell
Not necessarily. It's often the technology that makes things pricey more than microscopic amounts of precious materials.
Hi @_Maq_

My background is in the electronics industry. I've worked with products that use gold, platinum, palladium, etc. The technology was simplicity itself but the material costs were very high. So, dependent on the product being manufactured, it can go one way or the other.

JPC
 
Top