Day 4 of a new Roma 240 cycle, do I need to water change today?

Box of Demons

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10 Jan 2020
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Leeds
Here was Day 1 of my set up, any advice appreciated.

Here was day 2 of my tank set up.

Day 4 is today, I will test all water parameters with a master kit, my question is do i need to do a water change today? and how much? I have no livestock.

But have been doing.

6 hours light
5 hours co2
12 hours airstone.

Any advice appreciated.
 

alto

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24 Dec 2014
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5,992
Likely you’ve already opened your Master test kit - else I’d suggest returning it and just getting your tap water parameters from local water supply board and using those fund for my other suggestions ;)
(should be online)

Do a massive water change and get rid of that cloudy shite - it’s likely sewage (treatment) sludge bacteria rather than aquarium bacteria anyway - and based upon the directions of adding a few fish and then waiting some weeks before adding more ... that’s the same directions given if you have no “active starter”
Your plants might actually get some light when the water’s clear :D

You could definitely add more plants, starting with low plant mass is just a bit trickier than if you’ve planted densely from the start

CO2 ON - this should be starting well before lights ON so that CO2 is already at a good level when the plants begin photosynthesis, in hard water, this is frequently 2-3 hours before lights
BUT it also seems that tank may receive significant light from windows, so it’s beneficial to have CO2 available for this period as well (depending on light level in tank)

Photoperiod - is obviously chosen for when you’re able to view the tank, again depending on ambient light levels, this may end up being a long day for plants (which is usually fine once plant’s are established and actively growing, but initial photoperiod is usually 6-8h)

Air stone - I’ve never run one in a planted tank BUT your surface movement and film indicates that flow is insufficient in this tank (what filter do you have?) - I suggest an Eheim 350skim would be more useful than the air pump

Plants - a detailed list is helpful
You want to have some fast growing stem plants during tank set up to help balance the system (ie fight the Algae)
I would also suggest splitting up some of your plants clumps for better coverage (this seems to help trigger plant growth)
Tropica auxiliary plants https://tropica.com/en/guide/get-the-right-start/supporting-plants/

You can follow Tropica’s 90 Day App for starting a planted tank (water change every third day) BUT as your planting level is relatively light, I recommend large daily water changes of 70-80% (for water conservation, drain to garden etc rather than using the tap generated siphon)

Jurijs mit JS demonstrates separating 1-2-Grow plants in suitable clumps and planting technique

Water changes - you’ve got the Python, use it daily while tank is establishing - this is likely the cheapest and most effective defence against algae (just be careful when refilling the tank so you don’t disturb the substrate and cloud the tank, if this happens, just drain the tank and refill again)

Without livestock, you have no worries re massive water changes, loads of CO2 etc

First shrimp - choose a robust shrimp (avoid the more intensively line bred (& expensive!) colour shrimp), if you want to avoid the possibility of cross breeding layer when adding your blue or green shrimp, choose an alternate species such as tiger shrimp (there are a few species available in this group now, again select the cheap version so you can add 40 rather than 10 (ask the shop for a bulk buy offer))
 

Siege

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11 Aug 2017
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1,145
Location
Cambridgeshire, UK
I’ll echo everything that alto has said.

- more plants - fast growing stems, floating ones as well. Just pack it. Instead of buying potions, buy plants!

- co2, put it on perhaps 4 hours before lights, off an hour before lights go off. go yellow on the drop checker, there are no livestock to harm and it’ll help the plants get adapted.

- reduce working pressure to 30psi, the bubbles will be smaller. Change to inline co2 if you can.

- ditch the night light, it’s only detrimental.

- big daily water changes.

S.
 

dw1305

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7 Apr 2008
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Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
@Box of Demons, same as the others have said. Just more plants really, you can whack the CO2 up and then keep changing water. Once the plants have grown in you can add fish, it really is as simple as that.
Do a massive water change and get rid of that cloudy shite - it’s likely sewage (treatment) sludge bacteria rather than aquarium bacteria anyway - and based upon the directions of adding a few fish and then waiting some weeks before adding more
@alto is right. You don't ever need to add an ammonia source, or bacterial starters etc, to planted tanks.

I know it is confusing, but most of the advice given by "experts" on forums, youtube and by LFS etc. isn't right and is based upon a concept of "cycling" that recent scientific advances have shown to have <"no relevance to aquarium filters">. All the recent work actually very strongly suggests that traditional cycling will prolong the period when your tank water parameters are unstable.
more plants - fast growing stems, floating ones as well. Just pack it. Instead of buying potions, buy plants!
I'll be honest one of the problems with <"high oxygen levels, lots of plant and wait"> as a strategy is that it doesn't offer many opportunities to sell things to people (other than plants). If you can keep people's tanks staggering from one real (or imagined) crisis to another you can carry on selling them water testing kits, bacterial supplements, special biological filter media etc.

People often go back to the work of Dr Tim Hovanec in the 1990's, but our <"knowledge has moved on massively since then">. Have a read through page four of <"Bedside Aquarium">, it summarises where we are now.

cheers Darrel
 

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