• You are viewing the forum as a Guest, please login (you can use your Facebook, Twitter, Google or Microsoft account to login) or register using this link: Log in or Sign Up
  • You can now follow UKAPS on Instagram.

Nathanh2150

Member
Joined
9 Oct 2020
Messages
246
Location
Norwich
This will be my first time breeding some Apistogramma Cacatuoides DOUBLE RED Male + Female

I have a 17ltr aquarium
With
Coconut shell x1
Substrate tropica soil
Plants
Almond leaves x2
Heater got the tempture around 27•c
Led light unit
thinking do I need a breeding trap to store the baby’s in I have been looking at the Fluval Breeding Box.

Any help would be much appreciated.
 

Attachments

  • 8A9AE1DF-ACAC-4113-A84C-80CEA33215DA.jpeg
    8A9AE1DF-ACAC-4113-A84C-80CEA33215DA.jpeg
    411.8 KB · Views: 91
  • 8B0A539D-43A9-4480-9081-140C04B47766.jpeg
    8B0A539D-43A9-4480-9081-140C04B47766.jpeg
    498.6 KB · Views: 57

Conort2

Member
Joined
16 Feb 2018
Messages
599
Location
London
Unfortunately a 17litre is way too small for a pair of apistogramma. If the female isn’t ready to breed the male can be pretty hard on her and in a 17l she isn’t going to be able to get away. I’d recommend a 60l as the smallest sized aquarium for a pair of apistogramma. Could you not push for the 60version of the aquarium instead?

I’d then fill the tank full of plants and leaves, you need to have a lot of structure to give the fish places to hide.

There will be no need for a breeding trap, male and female will look after the fry for some time.

Cheers

Conor
 

Kalum

Member
Joined
8 Jan 2018
Messages
1,041
Location
Scotland
Where are you keeping the male and female after they breed?

Are you separating them?

They can show a lot of aggression (especially the female) so 17L is not enough even for experienced breeders, with that setup you would need to have a plan to deal with them longer term
 
Last edited:

Nathanh2150

Member
Thread starter
Joined
9 Oct 2020
Messages
246
Location
Norwich
I don’t see an issue with a 17ltr aquarium as a breeding tank as there plenty of room plus there not the biggest of fish I have seen many breeder’s house fish in smaller set ups. I have made sure that if there is any issues with female getting to harassed by the male to move her into my larger tank set up then to add her back into the breeding tank once all is settled with the male I have brought them as a breeding pair so they should be paired off and have been advised they have been showing spawning activities.
 

mort

Member
Joined
15 Nov 2015
Messages
1,655
Love the enthusiam but even with breeding pairs you can see aggression if the female isn't receptive to the male. I would read some of the journals on apistogramma.com because even experienced breeder with much larger tanks do experience mortalities. If you were to move any of the fish I would move the male. Dropping a new female that's not ready to breed in a tiny tank with a male isn't the easiest thing to get away with. At the very least try and make sure that the female has an area that it can escape to that the male can't fit in. With apistogramma this tends to be a cave that you partially cover the hole with some sand, the female can enter but the male can't.

This chap has bred fish for over 50 years and it's shows what he thinks you really need.

 

Hufsa

Member
Joined
22 Aug 2019
Messages
430
Location
-
Hey @Nathanh2150 , this may sound a bit direct and I dont mean to offend you by writing this.
But I cant help but notice you've made a lot of threads on the forum asking for help,
and many knowledgeable members have chimed in to help you make good choices and to avoid mistakes.
Instead it feels a bit like you are asking for advice and then doing whatever you want to do instead, which is discouraging for the people who are taking their time to write up posts trying to help you.
I really think you could do better at taking to heart the advice you are given, and listening to it.
Its a good thing to consider all the options and not following all advice blindly, but its not a good thing to be too headstrong either.

I write this with the best of intentions and I hope you have a successful first spawn with your apistos.
As the other posters above have written I think you need to get them a much bigger setup.
 
Last edited:

dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
12,199
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
They are a <"good fish to try">, they aren't difficult and you can rehome the juvenile fish without too many problems.
I have a 17ltr aquarium
I'm not being funny, but you need a much bigger tank.
I don’t see an issue with a 17ltr aquarium as a breeding tank
You don't have to listen to any of the posters on this thread, but I can tell you unequivocally that it isn't anything like big enough and the advice @Conort2 and @mort would be my advice as well.
I have brought them as a breeding pair so they should be paired off
thinking do I need a breeding trap to store the baby’s in I have been looking at the Fluval Breeding Box.
Apistogramma cacatuoides isn't exactly pair forming, they are harem breeders, the best results come from leaving the fry in with the female until well after they are free-swimming.

cheers Darrel
 

Conort2

Member
Joined
16 Feb 2018
Messages
599
Location
London
I only say these things as I’ve done the exact same thing in the past when I couldn’t find decent advice so freely and seen the consequences. I’d rather people learn from my mistakes than go kill the fish themselves. Apistogramma may be small but they can be vicious when it comes to breeing, they’re cichlids not platys. They’ll herd a whole community aquarium to one corner of a 36inch tank when spawning.

Stick some endler guppy’s in there if you want to breed fish in a 17litre tank.
 

Sammy Islam

Member
Joined
12 Mar 2019
Messages
692
Location
Hertfordshire
I'm not going to repeat what others have said, as the advice is clear. In reality the fish need to be happy with their environment before they will consider spawning. The fish might be small but this doesn't mean you can put them in a small tanks, different fish have different requirements and temperaments regardless of their size, take the pea puffer as an example.

But at the end of the day 17L is no way near enough volume, i wouldn't even put a betta fish in there. Especially as some tanks don't actually hold the amount of water they claim to, plus once you have added soil and plants etc then there will be less than 17L.
 
Last edited:

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
484
Location
London
Hello again,

<You may have seen my thread here where I talk about my apistos breeding>, which has been really wonderful. My tank is a 60L, and it is the minimum size you should consider, I say that with my current experience. Yes, some professional breeders use smaller tanks, but they are also changing all the water every day, feeding 6x a day, and have many extra tanks ready in case anything goes wrong. Why would you try to do it like a professional breeder? It will not be as nice an experience for you or the fish, but if you do it in a bigger tank it will be really enjoyable and beautiful, one of the highlights is when the fry are young, and the motherfish will travel with them around the tank in a cloud around her to feed - you need the size to experience this fascinating behaviour. You need the space partly for the parents, who must be able to get away from eachother (my female still killed my male the day before the babies came out from their cave, I didn't realise they had eggs even then), and for the babies - they aren't tiny fry forever and they have to get to a good size before you can give them to the LFS, spawns can be from 10 to 150 fry, they need a bigger tank so the water quality doesn't decline extremely quickly. My 30 fry are currently 1 - 3cm, and they use all of the tank all the time, I wouldn't want them in anything smaller. Even my 60l is pushing it, I do a lot more waterchanges to compensate.

When I first got my apistogramma, it was because my dad bought the pair for his 45l tank, which he read online was big enough. They were in there for 2 days, and it was clear the tank was too small for them to swim about as they wanted to, so he gave them to me. Give them the big tank and they will reward you with beautiful colouring and fascinating behaviour, why bother to keep and breed them if you aren't making them happy? I have just bought a tank 3x the size of my 60l so I can keep the apistos in there, I think that will be even more fascinating and make them even happier, apistogramma are clearly very intelligent fish and they need to be respected by you - they are relying on your to treat them well.

You seem to have a thing about putting fish in tanks which are too small - first you wanted discus in a 90cm, now you want apistos in a 17l. The apistos are simply too big, too intelligent and too active for this. Put them in the 90cm, if they start to look interested in breeding, buy a 60l. The 90cm is a perfect size for the apistogramma to really thrive. Stop thinking that just because a fish is small it can survive in a tiny tank, all fish need a good amount of space to thrive, even in large tanks they're in smaller spaces than they would be in the wild. Be generous with your fish, they deserve it!!
 
Last edited:

Nathanh2150

Member
Thread starter
Joined
9 Oct 2020
Messages
246
Location
Norwich
Hi all
I have a breeding pair of Apistogramma Cacatuoides DOUBLE RED Male + Female

Got home from work done a check up on the fish could not find the female anywhere she wasn’t in the coconut shell but I found her in the middle of the almond leaves she popped out and to my surprise to find that the female has laid a-load of eggs around 20-25 that I could see without disturbing the female as she’s doing her thing wile the male is keeping guard around her they are in there own tank with no other fish just them on there own what’s the next steps I should do as tomorrow I was going to do a water change should I now leave doing that ? Fist time in my aquarium hobby that I have had any fish that have spawned..


all the help would be much appreciated 🙃🙂
 

Attachments

  • BC9FD463-D4BE-478C-94F3-52B002AC9102.jpeg
    BC9FD463-D4BE-478C-94F3-52B002AC9102.jpeg
    1.5 MB · Views: 62
  • A0DBCF91-29DC-4E0D-820E-1343E43A4FDA.jpeg
    A0DBCF91-29DC-4E0D-820E-1343E43A4FDA.jpeg
    563.5 KB · Views: 44
  • 2630F667-6D74-4673-A777-EAC45B2AEB47.jpeg
    2630F667-6D74-4673-A777-EAC45B2AEB47.jpeg
    682.8 KB · Views: 39

Nathanh2150

Member
Thread starter
Joined
9 Oct 2020
Messages
246
Location
Norwich
Got home from work done a check up on the fish could not find the female anywhere she wasn’t in the coconut shell but I found her in the middle of the almond leaves she popped out and to my surprise to find that the female has laid a-load of eggs around 20-25 that I could see without disturbing the female as she’s doing her thing wile the male is keeping guard around her they are in there own tank with no other fish just them on there own what’s the next steps I should do as tomorrow I was going to do a water change should I now leave doing that ? Fist time in my aquarium hobby that I have had any fish that have spawned..


all the help would be much appreciated 🙃🙂
 

Attachments

  • A84F1E3E-066E-4E10-8AE4-AC60842BB5FA.jpeg
    A84F1E3E-066E-4E10-8AE4-AC60842BB5FA.jpeg
    1.5 MB · Views: 41
  • 46ACABDD-8ABE-4D4C-A32E-3439F7890BB9.jpeg
    46ACABDD-8ABE-4D4C-A32E-3439F7890BB9.jpeg
    682.8 KB · Views: 41
  • FBC59C1C-2341-407F-9F42-BB138F3D74FE.jpeg
    FBC59C1C-2341-407F-9F42-BB138F3D74FE.jpeg
    563.5 KB · Views: 34

Samala

New Member
Joined
16 Oct 2020
Messages
4
Location
Florida, USA
If they are still in the 17l, watch the pair very very closely. Your female is likely to aggressively guard her clutch and will usually push the male outside of her perceived territory at this point. In a tank this size that would likely put him into a corner or at best into his own half/end.

The female's protective instincts are usually heightened after fry are free swimming (typically 10-14 days after eggs are laid, depending on water temperature). Should you find the male spending time near the surface (as one photo somewhat indicates) I would move him to another tank.

You can continue normal water changes, just ensure water is similar temperature, hardness; the usual good husbandry routine.
 

Nathanh2150

Member
Thread starter
Joined
9 Oct 2020
Messages
246
Location
Norwich
Ok shall keep an eye on the both I did knotice the female bashing the male with her tail but apart from that I haven’t seen any other aggression as when I took that photo I had just popped some food in the tank to see where the female was.. if anything I’m happy moving the male into my large tank for the time being. Then once the fry are big enough gonna move them into a breeding tray and move the male back in. I’m just keeping an eye on them as this is there first batch and will do a small water change tomorrow. I have ordered some brine shrimp to feed the fry and some micro worms also anything elc I should think off ??
 

Conort2

Member
Joined
16 Feb 2018
Messages
599
Location
London
I’d move the male back into your larger aquarium and keep the fry with the female. Don’t put them in a breeding trap, these are no good for cichlid fry. Allow the mother to look after the fry and only put the pair back together in this aquarium once you have moved the fry on.
 

sparkyweasel

Member
Joined
30 Jun 2011
Messages
1,996
Congrats :)
Have you got your fry food cultures going? Or brine shrimp hatchery set up and ready to go? Depending on the temperature and other factors the eggs will hatch in about two days, and the fry will start swimming after another two or three days. Until then they feed from a sac of yolk attached to their throats. Once they are free-swimming they need to eat. Lots of small feeds is best but you have to do what you can manage.
I would leave the water change. Two fish in a planted tank shouldn't be a problem for water quality, - unless you have been having issues.
Some people will do water changes on their usual schedule, working well away from the nest, carefully matching the new water to the tank water, and adding it very gently.
Watch out for any agression between the pair. If it's bad you might need to remove the male.
 
Last edited:

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
484
Location
London
Yes I agree, remove the male now. Keep the female with the babies until they start to swim away from her/ignore her rather than stay by her side, which is usually a good month or more, though it can vary if they are inexperienced parents. Don't try to breed them too much, enjoy this first lot and treat them the best you can with a lot of live food several times as day. When they are big enough to swim about alone and are big enough not to be eaten, put them in your big tank, they will benefit from the water quality of a bigger tank, they're very sweet the easy they interact.
 

Nathanh2150

Member
Thread starter
Joined
9 Oct 2020
Messages
246
Location
Norwich
Thankyou I have just taken him out she is in between the two almond leaves I shall leave her to it now and shall do a water change tomorrow I currently have her tank set on 27c is this ok as I read it was ?? Cannot wait to have the time to watch them grow and I have plenty of food for them
 

Nathanh2150

Member
Thread starter
Joined
9 Oct 2020
Messages
246
Location
Norwich
Hi Thankyou for your message,
I have removed the male to my bigger tank
And have left the female with the eggs
I have brine shrimp for the baby’s once they are free swimming would I need to remove the female or just keep her in ? Also I have the temperature on 27c read that was the right temperature..
I haven’t touched the almond leaves as didn’t want to disturb the female as this is there first batch. I have been looking into a breeding tray to pop the eggs into and having it hand on the side of the tank but not sure atm also adding a different filter to a air pump filter. I have been told doing water changes would be fine as long as it’s at the same temperature what would u say would be best
 

Similar threads

Top